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Anglo-Creoles

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 226–236.
Published: 01 November 2023
... legacy of Anglo-Creoles by pushing against the assumption that these Creoles are a lingua franca restricted to Black folk cultures in the Caribbean. Beginning with European migration to the Caribbean, Creole Noise charts the colonial and postcolonial emergence of robust, creative vernaculars...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 65–79.
Published: 01 November 2016
... relationship with creole and creoleness as two different fictive ethnicities that are signified differently in Latin America and the French and Anglo-Caribbean, respectively. The essay concludes with a proposal for the Spanish Caribbean as a heuristic that reconnects Spanish, Anglo-, and French Caribbean...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2009) 13 (1): vii–xiv.
Published: 01 March 2009
... beginnings, earlier moments of intellectual work in and on the Anglo-Creole Caribbean, moments that I count as founding for my own intellectual formation: the moment of New World Quarterly in the 1960s; and the moment of Savacou in the 1970s. To my mind, these are the two...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (3 (42)): 85–88.
Published: 01 November 2013
... shares this function: as a Pan-Caribbean enterprise, we are increasingly attentive to the importance of expanding beyond the Anglo-Creole space and to the real challenges that arise as we envision such expansiveness. In the last almost-decade we have published three issues devoted exclusively...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2011) 15 (2 (35)): vii–x.
Published: 01 July 2011
... to finish (I’m coming to learn), entails conducting long, detailed interviews with Caribbean writers, scholars, and political actors whose works and whose lives have been formative for the making of the post-independence Anglo-Creole Caribbean—that is to say, the Caribbean in which I...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (2 (41)): 1–7.
Published: 01 July 2013
... are to ask productively about the contemporary as a question of the Caribbean for the critical imagination. What today is Caribbean studies? What can it be? I should say at the outset, by way of a situating disclosure, that I am going to self-consciously speak almost entirely here of the Anglo-creole...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): vii–x.
Published: 01 March 2016
... as a substantive: the human). 2 Certainly she was already iconic to me—but perhaps in a less abstract or, in any case, a more circumscribed way. To me, at the time, Wynter was one of the predominant figures in a Jamaican (and, more broadly, Anglo-creole Caribbean) intellectual generation, whose work had...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 17–32.
Published: 01 March 2017
... and Maarit Forde about the Anglo-creole Caribbean generally, I can present results from my research on the ethical work of spiritual workers and healers. 53 In most cases, the previously mentioned terms related to “obeah” ( gadè , maji nwè , gajé , tjenbwatè , obeahman ) are not those used...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2012) 16 (2 (38)): 75–85.
Published: 01 July 2012
... slide into a golden age of engagé criticism and political heat that I may wish for. 3 There is no denying that the 1970s was a memorable decade of debate and dispute in terms of emergent critical agendas. That the “boom” in Anglo-Creole literary production of the 1950s and the shaping of this field...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (2 (71)): 86–97.
Published: 01 July 2023
... to console / the friendless one, me. 5 The sounds the words made also felt muffled. Anglophone Caribbean Creoles contain no dental fricatives, so words like the Standard English this and thing become dis and ting in everyday speech. In the original Anglo-Saxon, by contrast, that th sound...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (2 (71)): 75–85.
Published: 01 July 2023
... the Atlantic on the same ship maintained as one of the strategies to contest the threat to their personhood posed by their circumstances as enslaved or indentured laborers? 16 Replacing Anglo-Saxon with the study of Creole languages would not in and of itself guarantee the assumptions undergirding...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): 59–73.
Published: 01 February 2006
... research, have revealed a relevant reality: several Anglo-Caribbean students with scholarships granted by the Cuban gov- ernment since the early seventies lived, worked, or did both in Cuba for long years. Some of them adopted the Rastafari faith in Cuba and interacted with the Cuban brethren...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2009) 13 (3 (30)): vii–x.
Published: 01 November 2009
... in Eloge de la créolité, there already existed a fundamental body of Caribbean work devoted precisely to the excavation of the interior landscape of “creoleness.” Now, needless to say, it is hardly my point here to make a claim for the privilege of anglo- phone precedence...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (2 (71)): 51–71.
Published: 01 July 2023
... years, my subjects were English, French, and Spanish, and at the University of the West Indies (UWI), which I attended from 1962 through 1965, my concentration was on English literature. This involved three years of Anglo-Saxon literature, in addition to medieval and sixteenth-century literature...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 237–245.
Published: 01 November 2023
... of a Miami neighbor (Cuban? African American? Anglo?) baffled by “funny” Jamaican Creole, that disturbance is not only a matter of speaking truth to power—big tree, small axe—but potentially also an intra-Caribbean, diasporic disturbance that both links and separates anglophone Caribbean people from other...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2012) 16 (3 39): 39–57.
Published: 01 November 2012
... the Anglo-Creole Caribbean. Over the last several years, Small Axe has published a number of issues that focus on the French-speaking Ca- ribbean, and we are now initiating a fuller integration of sustained critical reflections on the literary, political, historical, and visual cultures of the wide...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 108–118.
Published: 01 July 2022
...—represented the larger political reality that would continue to plague the Anglo-Caribbean. As Deborah A. Thomas elucidates in Modern Blackness , although these nationalist projects drew on formerly spurned and criminalized African cultural heritage to consolidate a national identity, they failed to improve...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2009) 13 (3 (30)): 74–83.
Published: 01 November 2009
... because of any innate talent [laughs]. MM: In an article you wrote in response to Césaire’s death, you spoke about the “absurd uni- versity category” of the postcolonial.6 In France, there tends to be a certain resistance toward the postcolonial, which is often perceived as an Anglo-Saxon term...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (2 (71)): 201–204.
Published: 01 July 2023
... teaches at Brandeis University. M aureen W arner -L ewis is emeritus professor of African-Caribbean language and orature in the Department of Literatures in English, University of the West Indies, Mona, where her teaching specializations were Anglo-Saxon, West Indian, African, and oral literatures...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 211–219.
Published: 01 March 2017
... culture, in contrast, for example, to the more empirical spirit of ‘Anglo-Saxon’ thought” (“The Créolité Movement,” 221). It may be relevant that the Mintz's and my essay has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, and Dutch but has never aroused the interest of French scholars or publishers. Indeed...