Alasdair MacIntyre is one of the most remarkable contemporary moral and political philosophers. Certainly, his work has had a large influence on my own thinking over the years. Born in Scotland in 1929, MacIntyre is a generative and prolific writer, the author of a number of pathbreaking books, among them After Virtue; Whose Justice, Which Rationality?; and Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopaedia, Genealogy, and Tradition. These are books, systematic interventions into ongoing debates, that have sought to alter the character and project of Anglo-American philosophy against the liberal “self-image of our age,” whether represented in the neo-Kantian foundationalism of John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice, on the one hand, or the postmodern antifoundationalism of Richard Rorty’s Philosophy in the Mirror of Nature, on the other.1

To my mind, one of the more significant features of MacIntyre’s...

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