One of the most remarkable developments in the Caribbean and its diaspora over the past two decades or so is the emergence of a generation of young visual artists working in various media (paint, film, performance) who have been transforming Caribbean visual practice, perhaps even transfiguring Caribbean visual culture. A significant part of the veritable explosion of Caribbean art in this period is owed to this generation. Undoubtedly, the increasing visibility of Caribbean art is not unconnected to other significant developments—for example, the transformation of mobilities (the literal and digital movement of ideas and people in new ways across the globe) and a decentering of the evaluative and temporal assumptions of modernism that secured the privilege of certain aesthetic norms over others.

But part of what is important in thinking about this generation of artists is its location in a new conjuncture of postcolonial Caribbean...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.