The death of Nelson Mandela on Thursday, 5 December 2013, will undoubtedly invite, provoke, many different sorts of discussion about his legacy, in particular the meaning of his political life for the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, but also his significance for the contemporary world at large. Certainly one of the issues that his passing will call into renewed critical debate is that of the unresolved ambiguities surrounding the ethics and politics of redress and reconciliation. By the time of his death, it is generally agreed, Mandela had become a universal symbol of forgiveness for historical injustice. Because here was a man whose people had been dispossessed and brutalized, and who personally had suffered cruelly for his commitment to fighting his oppressors, and who was able and willing, nevertheless, to extend forgiveness to those who had trespassed against him and against his people. Mandela...

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