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women and the law

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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (3): 389–408.
Published: 01 December 2021
...Emma Herdman Abstract A Renaissance querelle was primarily litigious. As such, it was heavily gendered: women, who were culturally expected to be conciliatory, not argumentative, were excluded from the law courts. This article uses the example of Madeleine des Roches—a widow, and so legally...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (3-4): 377–385.
Published: 01 May 2005
... HISTORIES IN SAND 379 vincingly demonstrates that the analysis of "social practices and cultural attitudes within households does not reveal a new domesticity." On the contrary it shows how "frequently women in certain positions in the family made use of republican ideology, new laws and new access...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 211–226.
Published: 01 May 2008
... attend to political exigencies and absents himself, leaving his mother in charge, who perversely abuses her power. In effect, the prince manages to curb his mother's desire for chair (raiche, but in his absence-in the absence of the law-she can no longer restrain herself. The message is simple: women...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 131–149.
Published: 01 May 2022
...Yonsoo Kim Abstract Physical illness may lead women to grow spiritually, reflect on their lives, and learn how to write about their unique experiences. A fifteenth-century Castilian writer, Teresa de Cartagena distinguishes herself for being a nun, a conversa , a member of a powerful Jewish family...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2015) 106 (1-4): 71–92.
Published: 01 January 2015
... in the Algerian quartet,S a series of novels focusing on women's experiences in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Algeria.6 Over a decade had gone by since the publication of the quartet's third novel, So Vast the Prison, which came out in 1995, the year of her father's death. When Nowhere was finally...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (4): 405–415.
Published: 01 November 2001
... portrayals or the thematization of injustice toward women. Both Sand and Belgiojoso denounce female oppression and challenge existing marriage laws in their writings. Their heroines are often strong-willed, intelligent, and unafraid in their defiance of social conventions. Although the correspondence between...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2016) 107 (1-4): 57–76.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Ispahan seraglio. Not that Usbek loves these women; as he explains early on in the novel to Nessir, his most intimate correspondent, one may avoid such emotional attachments through sexual oversatiety: Dans le nombreux sérail où j ai vécu, j ai prévenu l amour et l ai détruit par l­ui-m­ ême (138...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2003) 94 (3-4): 429–436.
Published: 01 May 2003
... with the rest of the body." What kind of metamorphoses would this supposition inspire in the colonies? If a piece of body could carry mind along with it, then we are dealing with a world in which the meaning of mind and matter, once rendered in codes of law, would be reconfigured as the logic of punishment...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 175–190.
Published: 01 January 2012
... little reaction either to her rape or to her attempt to kill him. When they return home, he is persuaded by his father-in-law to recount his unfortunate adventure. The enraged count seals his daughter in a barrel and casts her into the sea. She is rescued by Flemish merchants and taken to the 1. Crow...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (3-4): 259–274.
Published: 01 May 2005
... him stands the Nation, no longer made up of orders granted privileges, but of citizens obeying a unique Law-the citizen par excellence, citoyen actif, being, however, neither a female, nor a domestic, nor exceedingly poor. Directly responsible to the Nation, this citizen is conceived of as independent...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (4): 417–431.
Published: 01 November 2000
... when I have considered seriously the contexture of the Turkish government, the absoluteness of an Emperor without Reason, without Virtue, whose Speeches may be irrational, and yet must be Laws; whose Actions irregular, and yet examples, whose Sentence and Judgment, if in matters of the Imperial...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 11–47.
Published: 01 January 2012
... that is unavoidably determined by the laws of nature. The closeness of this to Averroes's thought led Martinez Casado to suppose that the Leonese author knew his work directly, perhaps without the mediation of written Latin translation: "~debemos pensar en un conocimiento muy completo, quiza sin traducci6n escrita...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (3): 277–296.
Published: 01 May 2001
..., is feeling caught between the bourgeois world of his in-laws and the bohemian, intellectual circle to which he aspires. At a soiree at his in-laws' home, he is encouraged to gossip about his eccentric Aunt Berthe, and he is caught between his love of being the center of attention and his desire to appear...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (3-4): 199–222.
Published: 01 May 2013
.... Effaced behind a veil of hypocrisy and politesse, she secretly orchestrates a quasi-incestuous affair between jean-Luze and her other sister, Annette. In so doing, she projects onto Annette her own violent desire for jean-Luze and enacts revenge against both her sisters and her brother-in-law, himself...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (4): 363–379.
Published: 01 November 2001
... and victimization, willed authority and unwelcome restriction, radically interact, offers an important clue to a major project of the Lais: the depiction of women for whom creative or authoritative utterance is intimately connected with victimization, loss, and even destruction. ("The Talking Wounded" 142) Marie's...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2016) 107 (1-4): 77–102.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of George Sand s death and the publication of Daniel Deronda, George Eliot s last novel, the distinguished critic Sidney Colvin observed: The art of fiction has reached its highest point in the hands of two women of our time. One of them has just been taken away, and as we read the work of the other who...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (1-2): 23–43.
Published: 01 January 2013
... OF TORTURE 33 trustworthiness, late twelfth- and thirteenth-century jurists and teachers of law raised the confession of the accused to the highest level of value Particularly for capital crimes, this hierarchy of proofs was to provide the essential background to the use of torture. (Torture 46) That use...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (3-4): 343–362.
Published: 01 May 2005
...; rather, it draws its legitimacy from a new social order in which men and women are equal partners and in which notions such as "unwed mother" and "illegitimate child" are meaningless, even absurd. In accordance with Fran<;oise Massardier-Kenney's remark that many Sand novels focus on the "price paid...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 145–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Gravdal, Ravishing Maidens. Writing Rape in Medieval French Literature and Law (Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1991); review in Medium Aevum 61 (1992): 343-5. 2. See httphosted.lib.uiowa.edu/smfs/mff/. 3. Romance Notes, 25.3 (1985). The volume contains a substantial introductory essay by jane Burns...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2002) 93 (3): 323–340.
Published: 01 May 2002
... in many of Duras' works. In L'Homme assis dans Ie couloir, sex is emptied of its social and emotional content and its object, the female body, placed crudely on centre stage where the lascivious and extremely mobile narrator can observe it at leisure. The law of lust that drives the narrative creates...