1-20 of 408 Search Results for

the book of nature

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 May 2020
... that allowed the fictional beings of Troy to proliferate in the Middle Ages. I conclude with an examination of the medieval topos of the “book of nature,” which offers a compelling example of the spirituality of technology. Works Cited [Alan of Lille] de Insulis Alanus . “ De Incarnatione Christi...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (3): 245–258.
Published: 01 May 2001
..., the social discourse of nature, 14. In Emile's education, the role of reading and of books is considerably reduced in comparison to their usual educative functions. This idiosyncracy is easily explained when one recalls Rousseau's mistrust of all education falsified by man and of all types of reported...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 8–26.
Published: 01 May 2020
... .” In The Book of Nature and Humanity in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance , edited by Hawkes David and Newhauser Richard G. , with the assistance of Nathaniel Bump , 8 – 18 . Turnhout : Brepols , 2013 . Harvey P. D. A. “ Local and Regional Cartography in Medieval Europe...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 128–150.
Published: 01 May 2020
... from the perspective of Christian faith. Seen in these terms, bestiaries are therefore “nature books, but not books of natural history” (Clark 1). Moreover, their descriptions are governed by symbolic rather than observational principles; as Gabriel Bianciotto remarks, “On a souvent le sentiment que le...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 619–637.
Published: 01 November 2010
... at correct conclusions, but natural theology requires first a foundation of faith, through obedience, to ensure that the book of nature is properly read. More aexplicitly, Montaigne writes, "La foy venant teindre et illustrer les argumens de Sebon, elle les rend fermes et solides" ["When faith tinges...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 11–47.
Published: 01 January 2012
... significant figure for heresiology, Averroes, the philosopher from Cordova. Exploring the influence of Averroes on Ruiz appears to me the best way to approach that heterodox dimension of the Book that Lida de Malkiel seemed to want to ignore, despite her defense of the Semitic nature of a work that she...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 106–127.
Published: 01 May 2020
... Inquiry into Modes of Existence enables a new reading of medieval encyclopedias that takes seriously Latour’s suggestion that premodern cosmologies retain importance for modern ecological thought while simultaneously challenging his arguments about the rigidity of ontologies based on ideas of nature...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (4): 514–517.
Published: 01 November 2001
... of naturalism (as is found, for example, in the opening pages of La-bas, where naturalism is critiqued with mordant gusto by Huysmans's Durtal). So "Melanie Klein's model of infantile depression," Ziegler argues, "can be used to explain the Decadents' hostility toward naturalism and their BOOK REVIEWS 517...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (1): 106–109.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., the unseizable water, the untellable earth which constitute the paradoxical reality of what the tide of Mathieu's book calls ""I'evidence du silnple" and ""I'eclat de l'obscur": nanlely, the here-and-now irrefutability and evidence of elenlental nature, on the one hand, and the explosive, radiant presence...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2017) 108 (1-4): 331–335.
Published: 01 January 2017
... a totalizing vision of nature, Sand, Mathias argues, celebrates the inscrutability of nature (147). Mathias develops this argument out of her examination of Sand s scientific figure, l artiste naturaliste, who, she argues, Book Reviews 335 has the unique capacity to contemplate the world through...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2017) 108 (1-4): 195–215.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Revolution, the double spiral staircase at the c­ astle of Chambord, and the naturalization of foreigners into empires. Given their implicit disagreements about how to write essays, why do Montaigne and Bacon agree on w­ hether to write them? Why, if he wanted to write so differently from his pred­ e­cess­or...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (2): 199–221.
Published: 01 September 2022
... , 2008 . Daston Lorraine , and Park Katharine . Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150–1750 . New York : Zone Books , 1998 . Dietz Bettina . “ Mobile Objects: The Space of Shells in Eighteenth-Century France .” British Journal for the History of Science 39 , no. 3 ( 2006...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (1-2): 127–145.
Published: 01 January 2013
... obvious and surprising. For readers of Pinget it will indeed be obvious. One might, of course, hypothesize the existence of radical "hetero-readers" who have yet to discover the sexuality of books that they nonetheless know inside out. For such readers, then, let us mention by way of introduction...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 281–296.
Published: 01 May 2008
... Press, 2002; and R. Bottigheimer, The Ultimate Fairy Tale: Oral Transmission in a Literate World, in The Companion to the Fairy Tale, ed. H. Davidson, A. Chaudhri, D. Brewer, Woodbridge, Boydell & Brewer, 2003, pp. 57-70. 12. The conclusion of the book naturally leads to a continuation. At the end...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 January 2005
... 2440 would be an early harbinger of the nineteenth-century trend towards futuristic utopias). Hence the proximity of utopia and travel literature during the 116 BOOK REVIEWS period under study, a pairing which might otherwise seem surprising given the intrinsically imaginary nature of the former...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (3-4): 275–292.
Published: 01 May 2013
... and vocabulary of love poetry. In DRN, the frenzies of lust constitute a vocabulary for everything from the cycles of nature (in book 1) to the vagaries of sense perception (book 4). Moreover, Lucretius's recourse to the figure of Venus makes even war and peace subject to desire: the goddess seduces warlike Mars...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 639–654.
Published: 01 November 2010
... and present.9 In the praemia to his first book, Machiavelli urges his readers to believe in the possibility of imitation on the basis of the invariance of human nature. Or, in practical terms, Florence can imitate Rome since the Florentines are really like the ancient Romans. But of course, if they were...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (1): 99–101.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., sellti1~ which Andre's text contrasts with puel~ to the human sitter instead of to nature as a whole. Lathers' translation, "How difficult it is BOOK REVIEWS 101 to find the exact point at which one nlust cease to imitate nature in painting. Painting must not stink (puer) of the Illodel one tnust...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2015) 106 (1-4): 206–211.
Published: 01 January 2015
... Montaigne's impatient view of commentaries: "When did we ever agree: 'this book has had enough, there is nothing more to say about it Of course what Montaigne overlooks in this complaint is the ever-shifting nature of the book's readership, whose cultural circumstances, experience, and values are forever...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 192–203.
Published: 01 May 2020
... the other four triptychs in his most systematic book. Desmond and Guynn expertly diagnose the failings of [DC] in Modernity and are right to suggest that medieval studies harbors natural resources for overcoming it; I also appreciate their use of the slang term clickbait to encapsulate the temptations...