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stanza

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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (4): 459–479.
Published: 01 November 2000
... movement, Valery sounds the key of the poem, presenting the language that echoes throughout its development while he delineates the themes of the poem - the transformation from contemplation to creation and from day to night. The remaining twelve stanzas compose the development of "Profusion du soir...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 65–86.
Published: 01 May 2022
... Guinizzelli Avicenna Taddeo Alderotti Sometime during the first quarter of the fourteenth century, Florentine physician Dino del Garbo took into his hands a vernacular canzone on the nature of love, and, together with a thorough Scholastic divisio textus of the stanzas, offered a medical reading...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 11–47.
Published: 01 January 2012
... in a fundamental article published in El erotalon in 1985. The famous stanzas seventy-one to seventy-six are mere examples of the many instances of the malicious parading of authorities observed in the Book, and would seem practically anodyne or simply rhetorical if the ideas formulated there did not evoke a past...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 257–261.
Published: 01 January 2010
... at Riffaterre's hands. I needed proof, textual proof: on to the next stanza! Impetueux avec des douceurs virginales Et noires, fier de ses premiers entetements, Pareil aux jeunes mers, pleurs de nuits estivales, Qui se retournent sur des lits de diamants ; After inconnu, now I saw impetueux referring to the cuI...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2004) 95 (3): 249–269.
Published: 01 May 2004
... provide a rich metaphor for the association of the women with Poitiers and with Parnassus. References to rocks blend the attributes of the two places with the two women, and the inscription of their name-"rochers," "Roche," "Roches"-calls attention to this conflation. For example, the opening stanzas...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 May 2020
... the reverence expressed for the auctores in this couplet, none of them provided the primary source text for Troilus and Criseyde. Chaucer, moreover, never acknowledges his reliance on Boccaccio’s Filostrato , the vernacular text he “translated” stanza by stanza and the source text that generated...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2011) 102 (1-2): 109–127.
Published: 01 January 2011
... stanza of the Lais is a typographically busy space: Item, a Jehan Trouve', boucher, Laisse Le Mouton franc et tendre Et ung tacon pour esmouchier Le Beuf Couronne qu'on veult vendre, Et La Vache qu'on ne peult prendre. Le villain qui la trousse au col, S'il ne la rend, qu'on Ie puist pendre Ou assomer...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (4): 453–472.
Published: 01 November 2009
... male victim. Surprisingly, however, the "mile plus heureus eschanges" turn out to affect not the male, but the female body, in a blazon of seven stanzas. The various parts of Medusa's body are transformed through a series of metaphors and allusions. The first three lines set the pattern for six stanzas...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2019) 110 (1-4): 91–109.
Published: 01 January 2019
... traitants in the second stanza, to whom Deutz has attempted to sell his soul. Not only is impurity a quality often associated with blood, but the assertion that the soul is for sale implies a divorce from the body, which would then retain the imprint of a fundamentally Jewish essence. It is Deutz s...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (2): 231–254.
Published: 01 March 2006
... back his zither, and reminds the hero that he himself has chosen this destiny. The poem ends with Achilles embracing the slave girl Briseis and lying down to await the morning. In the closing stanza, having relinquished the zither, Achilles stands and listens to his horses, and "piu lontano il pianto...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 23–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
... "fragments" of a different kind: anthologies of lyric coblas. One of the components that make up chansonnier D is the florilegium of Ferrari da Ferrara, a collection of mainly one- or two-stanza excerpts from courtly cansos that purports (according to the prefacing vida) to distil the essence of the songs...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2017) 108 (1-4): 27–29.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., this paragraph, this stanza composed the way it is and not some other way? Oh, I get it. Y­ ou re talking about what the author intended to say. Not exactly. What I mean is this. While facts about a writer s life and society are useful and always relevant, the ­really critical question is: How do his...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2017) 108 (1-4): 233–252.
Published: 01 January 2017
.... This fragment is the reinscription of the penultimate stanza of the poem Autre Éventail, de Mad­ em­ oi­selle Mallarm written the previous year and dedicated to his then nineteen-y­ ear-o­ ld ­daughter, Geneviève.6 Given the poem s destinee, it is a more troubling poem than is usually acknowledged...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 857–859.
Published: 01 November 2010
... of loving-the well-known folie d'amour, for instance-in light of religious doctrines and their use in later religious poetry. Reading this, however, one feels a lack of purpose. There is more to such a project than harvesting isolated lines and stanzas to sketch the troubadours' BOOK REVIEWS attitudes. One...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2002) 93 (1-2): 161–171.
Published: 01 January 2002
... seems to us hardly metaphorical: "A poet is a universe enclosed in a man. "27 Quite unconventional also is the bizarre personification of the Lyric Stanza as a joyous young girl who is captured and carried off, and the image of the unhappy victim sitting in the gloom of the poet's skull, Queen...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (1-2): 83–104.
Published: 01 January 2013
... text is shot through with morpho-lexical parallelisms and syntagmatic echoes following a rigorously chiasmic logic, essentially transforming the text into a kind of proleptic loop, or trou, articulated around a pivotal intersection at stanzas six and seven, both of which anaphorically open on similar...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (4): 431–451.
Published: 01 November 2009
...-persona's pain and inspiration. Let us consider the example of the death image that occurs in Sonnet VII. The first stanza sets the stage by emphasizing, in strongly Neoplatonic terms, the body/spirit dichotomy and the concept the couple as an idealized whole: 19. On the lay as Christine's closing statement...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 305–320.
Published: 01 September 2021
... (Feyel 67). L’Époque did not succeed in dethroning its predecessors in the forty-franc press, but because of L’Époque ’s outsized publicity efforts, its slogan, “Lisez l’Époque !” was quickly repurposed in dramatic parodies. In La Comedie parisienne , a revue of 1845, a series of stanzas conclude...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2002) 93 (1-2): 185–199.
Published: 01 January 2002
... by the other, or just an index of how we must read a text where such substitutions are permitted. An instance of this third possibility is found in the second stanza of Emily Dickinson's "Because I could not stop for Death," a poem not infrequently used in the humanities to introduce discussions of the ways...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 67–84.
Published: 01 January 2005
... soft life ashore with the rigors of the sea. Two stanzas are worth quoting in their entirety for their assumedly realistic detail. Car vous estes en peril de turner Souventefoiz en tempeste formee, Et lors vous fault en la souite avaIer, Gesir envers et la gueule baee, Pour la pueur la vomir mainte...