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mexican

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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2014) 105 (3-4): 187–200.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Rubén Gallo Copyright © 2014 The Trustees of Columbia University 2014 Ruben Gallo PROUST'S MEXICAN STOCKS Few people around him knew that Marcel Proust had developed a passionfor investing and that he spent considerable time and energy trading Latin American stocks. 1After the death of his...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 111–132.
Published: 01 January 2012
... subjects, collectively associated with the plebe or vulgo. To illustrate the attitude of the colonial elite toward the urban lower class, Rama cites a passage from the Mexican Creole scholar Sigiienza y Gongora's 1692 letter to his friend the Admiral Pez, at the time a resident in the Spanish court...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 3–10.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... As such, his article is at once a study of apostasy in colonial texts and a proposal for developing new reading practices. The question of modernity and heresy takes another turn in Anna More's article on the Mexican savant, Carlos de Sigiienza y Gongora. Sigiienza occupies a privileged position within...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2014) 105 (3-4): 145–146.
Published: 01 May 2014
... rereaders actually reread Proust. Along the way, Christie McDonald proposes a rereading of Samuel Beckett's readings of Proust; Ruben Gallo looks at Proust's readings of the stock market through his adventures with the Mexican Tramways Company; Edward Hughes takes on issues of reading and being read...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (1): 122–124.
Published: 01 January 2006
... and narrative personae are, as Pancrazio emphasizes over and again, always at the crossroads of several possible identities: they elnbody at the sanle tilne both a he and a she, Mexican and European, African and American, contrite and unrepentant. Carpentier resolves the question of the I and the other, inward...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 January 2006
... characters and narrative personae are, as Pancrazio emphasizes over and again, always at the crossroads of several possible identities: they elnbody at the sanle tilne both a he and a she, Mexican and European, African and American, contrite and unrepentant. Carpentier resolves the question of the I...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2014) 105 (3-4): 381–396.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., the genre developed throughout Latin America since the nineteenth century, a "brief hybrid essay combining personal observation with social documentary" (Anderson 146). Significantly, the cronica was one of the literary genres adopted by Mexican intellectuals after the 1985 earthquake that devastated Mexico...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2007) 98 (1): 83–101.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., and writing subject regresses instantly on the inhospitable shore of La Praya, yielding to powerful environmental forces that strip her of her mobility, ocular privilege, and analytical distance. In the same way that sea sickness had deprived the writer aboard The Mexican of her "facultes intellectuelles...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (3): 249–263.
Published: 01 May 2009
... the prevalent understandings of what constituted 'civilized' society" (19). In her letter of June 14, 1746, Graffigny makes clear that she deliberately avoided modeling her heroine after Mexican women of her age: "je ne me resoudrai jamais a faire de rna Zilie une petite sauvagesse meprisables [sic!] telles...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 49–64.
Published: 01 January 2012
... doubted that Quadros was really a Franciscan and a priest until the Peruvian Holy Office undertook the investigation that confirmed what the prisoner said. The same thing happened in relation to the origins of the Rodriguez Bala family, which the Mexican inquisitors suspected of being converso, a fact...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 371–400.
Published: 01 May 2006