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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 138–157.
Published: 01 May 2021
... to overcome the rigidity of text-based queries (and in-line markup embedded in text). Such paramount evolution is now made possible by the Semantic Web, an extension of the current web by description standards that help machines to understand and connect the information already available on the web...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (2): 177–198.
Published: 01 September 2022
... and affirmed in the context of the saint’s public ordeal. Second, Foucault’s reading of the body as the surface of inscription of such discursive conflicts sheds light on the ways in which the saint’s discourse rewrites the bodies of the two protagonists, Apollo and Chelinde, and frames them within the lines...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (3): 336–356.
Published: 01 December 2020
... of the Proustian sentimental orbit, doomed love, aligned chronologically and conceptually with the articulation in the 1890s of courtly love and made for dire consequences in a life lived along those lines. My wife, Ellen Handler Spitz, provides an emotionally corrective experience via the question, Was Swann...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2023) 114 (1): 57–76.
Published: 01 May 2023
... Robert Southwell (ca. 1561–95). In three parts, this essay explores the nature of solitude as prompted by this happy placement of Southwell’s lines praising conscience within a medieval French metrical translation of the Book of Revelation. The first part considers how the medieval manuscript glosses...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2023) 114 (2): 259–279.
Published: 01 September 2023
..., as reverberations of these disparities, late nineteenth- to early twentieth-century appraisals of Sigüenza’s text that have projected the unblemished geometrical lines of the Escorial onto the friar’s writing. Its overall aim is to shed light on the lingering tensions around language, architecture, and place...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (4): 459–479.
Published: 01 November 2000
.... Valery often discusses the regenerative nature of poetic form, insisting that the end of a poem does not signal its completion. Though the last stanzas of "Profusion du soir" climactically portray the darkness that threatens the speaker's vision, its final lines, calling for acceptance of mystery, recall...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 37–64.
Published: 01 May 2022
.... (4.8.1–2) 25. See Wallis 547; cf. Tobler and Lommatzsch 6: 602, lines 37, 39. 26. The term is also attested in Perceforest : see La Curne de Sainte-Palaye 238. 27. On Hippocratic practices and beliefs, see El-Radhi, Carroll, and Klein 290–91; El-Radhi and Kluger 219...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (3): 426–447.
Published: 01 December 2022
... textual tradition, and yet it is also her shortest lai at 118 lines. It is a text that tends to accumulate superlatives; in Monika Otter’s formulation, it is “the most condensed, knotted up, pared down” lai as well as “the most experimental” (175). R. Howard Bloch calls it “the least closed...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2007) 98 (2-3): 189–203.
Published: 01 May 2007
... haciendo su 'Oriente,' implantando su mirada, su lectura 'Oriente' es en Borges el estar siempre fuera de territorio, el estar plegado, 'en medio', intercalado entre todas las posibilidades" (102). Crucially, the Orient functions here not as a referent in line with conventional usage, but rather...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (4): 415–429.
Published: 01 November 2009
... de la litterature nationale, 2nd ed., vol. I (Paris: V. Palme, 1878) 505-06; see also his observations made from a different point of view 347-48. The Romanic Review Volume 100 Number 4 © The Trustees of Columbia University RICHARD TRACHSLER certain lines within a given chanson de geste. 2...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2023) 114 (1): 141–160.
Published: 01 May 2023
... rode words often move the heart to think on our lord. And so when you are at ease, speak to Jesus and say these words, and think as though he hung beside you, bloodied upon the cross (Thompson lines 647–58) 1 As Denis Renevey comments, “the narrator’s invitation to his audience...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (3-4): 275–292.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Jessie Hock Copyright © 2013 The Trustees of Columbia University 2013 Jessie Hock WAGING LOVING WAR: LUCRETIUS AND THE POETRY OF REMY BELLEAU I n 1558 Joachim du Bellay completed the first translation of Lucretius into French, twenty-two lines from the beginning of De rerum natura (henceforth...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 65–86.
Published: 01 May 2022
... cor gentil” starts off with a groundbreaking argument. As Luciano Rossi has observed, by framing the parallel between love (“amore”) and the noble heart (“cor gentil,” line 1) in the Aristotelian language of potency and act, Guinizzelli “does not limit himself to saying that Love is attracted...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (1-2): 163–187.
Published: 01 January 2000
... to be primarily semantic in nature. Lefevere objects, for instance, to T. Hart-Davies's rendering of lines 204-6 of Catullus 64, "annuit invicto caelestum numine rector/ quo motu tellus atque horrida contremuerunt/ aequora," as "The mighty Thunderer his dread assent/ Nodded propitious and the sound was sent...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 120–137.
Published: 01 May 2021
... scrittura ) is of medium size, 212 × 158mm, and is maintained consistently throughout the entire manuscript, displaying a still visible lead ruling: two single vertical lines for each column and forty-seven horizonal lines, creating the forty-six transcriptional lines, which start below the first upper...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 January 2005
... are not specifiable, for the poem makes an equal but different sense applied to Beatrice or the screen lady. Contradicting the prose, the last two lines says that he joys outwardly. He is dejected ("sbigottito," 7.1) with the loss of the screen lady, more than he imagined. But he adds that he wrote about her...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (4): 431–451.
Published: 01 November 2009
... that suffering to fuel poetic expression, turning it into positive action. The Dit de fa Pastoure is at the midpoint of Christine's body of poetry about love. The generic point of departure for the Dit is the 13th-century French pastourelle, a poem of typically 50 lines or less, in which the first-person speaker...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 267–268.
Published: 01 January 2010
... 206) This memory and so many others of Professor Riffaterre come rushing back as I glance at the title of an interview in the 1981 issue of Diacritics focusing on his work. What strikes me is not the straightforward title itself but rather its layout and typography. Uppercase lines spelling out...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 151–172.
Published: 01 May 2020
... until I had felt the wound that the spear did cleave”; play 38, lines 377–78). The fact that Thomas requires such proof to allay his doubt is, of course, also a sign of flawed faith. In the York play, “Doubting Thomas,” Deus tells the apostle to touch, and to “be no more mistrowand [unbelieving...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2011) 102 (1-2): 65–89.
Published: 01 January 2011
.... The fountain at the center of the romance nicely embodies this dilemma. I will summarize the scene briefly here and return to it later. When the lover/poet comes upon the fountain at line 1425, he immediately notices an inscription that announces that Narcissus died here.2 For about seventy lines he tells...