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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (3): 335–347.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Stamos Metzidakis Copyright © 2000 The Trustees of Columbia University 2000 Stamos Metzidakis BARTHESIAN DISCOURSE: HAVING YOUR CAKE AND EATING IT TOO When Philippe Sollers set out in May 1980, shortly after Roland Barthes'death, to write a succinct preface to the new, abridged edition...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 336–358.
Published: 01 September 2021
... education in general, textbooks sought to foster the conditions for culinary excellence as long as it remained within the “natural” limits of social class. If you are what you eat, you should eat what you are. Schooling in France in the nineteenth century mirrored the culinary divide between...
FIGURES | View All (7)
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 281–304.
Published: 01 September 2021
... functions in this text not only to reflect a socioeconomic reality of the nineteenth-century politics of eating, but also to introduce a budding aesthetic principle. The harlequin meal, composed of bits and pieces of various origins reassembled as a patchwork whole, inaugurates in Sue’s novel a reappearing...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 321–335.
Published: 01 September 2021
... in many, one might even argue all , of his writings. 1 For Perec, writing reflects the trauma of this loss just as it provides a way to heal from it. Another stark absence pervades Perec’s works, although it has received little critical attention: the lack of food. Perec’s protagonists rarely eat...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 87–111.
Published: 01 May 2022
... of the seventeenth century (pâtés, marinated fish, salads, cooked fruit). At any rate, his lapse in memory suggests that we are not being offered the full picture of this meal and allows us to imagine an infinite quantity and variety of dishes. The hermaphrodites do not seem to eat excessively, but rather turn...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 353–369.
Published: 01 May 2006
.... The 'starving' crowd discovers that it has been fooled and, increasingly mad, eats the king (Roi Bombance), his cooks, his servants and also the court poet (L'Idiot), the one who, telling his stories, had vainly attempted to direct the appetites of the people towards more idealistic objectives. In the end...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 305–320.
Published: 01 September 2021
... into Parisian chefs’ repertoires, only to return to their regions of origin through cookbooks or fiction that integrated the Parisian adjustments ( Accounting for Taste 123–26). Likewise, stories of provincial chestnut eating told of how such frugality served Parisian ambitions, and tales of chestnut trees...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (2): 181–187.
Published: 01 September 2021
... in her own reading of these texts. The third section, “Food Cultures,” takes up the important intellectual turn in Ferguson’s food studies. Janet Beizer’s essay, “The House of Harlequins: Les Mystères de Paris and Eugène Sue,” takes us into the strange “gastrotopia” of lower-class eating practices...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (1-2): 77–88.
Published: 01 January 2000
... for biting has appeared, then sucking becomes a sin and the infant is driven away from the breast" (135). Condemned for dental aggression, des Esseintes is the evil symbolized by his carious tooth, a recidivist consumer who has eaten and been forgiven but who will inevitably eat again. Incorrigible...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (1-2): 163–187.
Published: 01 January 2000
... the Latin dog is tossed mere tidbits and any bit of food which no one cares for ("frusta et quod fastidit quisque pulmentarium Samaniego's creature eats, in deftly styled broken feet, bread, slices of meat, and whatever else goes unwanted, such as a badly roasted piece or a bone whose meat has been chewed...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 175–189.
Published: 01 May 2008
... dress and concluded that she was a goddess. The lovesick prince stopped eating, declaring that he would only eat cake made by the girl he'd been told was named Donkeyskin. The disguised princess prepared a gateau, but dropped her ring into the dough. When the prince found it and declared he would marry...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (2): 207–231.
Published: 01 March 2005
... status as model wife to anyone who passes-thus, she cleans her husband's shoes on the doorstep while at the saIne time inconsid- erately exposing him to the cold morning air as he eats breakfast (36). Con- sidered in the context of these references to donlestic doors, the protagonist's lengthy hesitation...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 37–64.
Published: 01 May 2022
... the other beasts to decide on a new sovereign. They select the wolf, who swears on holy relics that he will become a vegetarian, but promptly invents a pretext for killing and eating his barons with legal impunity: he asks them to evaluate the smell of his breath, executing both those who tell him the truth...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2000) 91 (4): 524–525.
Published: 01 November 2000
... of Calderon," 153-161 Metzidakis, Stamos, "Barthesian Discourse: Having your Cake and Eating it Too," 335-347 Michael, Colette V., "Les Lettres de doleances: un genre de cahier ou des cahiers d'un nouveau genre," 1-13 Nouvet, Claire, "An Allegorical Mirror: The Pool of Narcissus in Guillaume de Lorris...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 273–275.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., resisting the urge to roll my eyes, I secretly hung on to everything he said for later consideration. Here is what I learned from Professor Riffaterre: Show up before anyone else to the office-it improves your reputation as a worker. Don't eat sub sandwiches for lunch. Water should be sufficient. La...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (1-2): 83–104.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., separating voyance might look like, to say nothing of a further point of articulation between the verse and prose poems. 13. Verlaine no doubt had in mind Goya's Saturn, but perhaps also Murillo's portraits of street-urchins eating grapes or picking lice off one another (a painting that figures prominently...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (3): 561–577.
Published: 01 May 2010
... of impersonal bureaucracy on the one hand, and the stain of obscene enjoyment on the other. This is how the knights eat: Le portate sono Ie solite dell'esercito: tacchino farcito, oca allo spiedo, brasato di bue, maialini di latte, anguille, orate. I valletti non han fatto a tempo a porgere i vassoi che i...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2009) 100 (4): 579–582.
Published: 01 November 2009
.... Every now and then, Caron includes some campy, often personal aside. "It's a good place to eat falafels and have sex," he writes of the Marais nowadays, "but not at the same time and preferably not in that order." Or again: "Think of Greenwich Village, New Orleans's French Quarter, or Miami's South...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2014) 105 (3-4): 341–350.
Published: 01 May 2014
... that their analysis, from the mechanistic point of view, is only a question of time. We eat, drink, and reproduce not because mankind has reached an agreement that this is desirable, but because, machine-like, we are compelled to do so. We are active, because we are compelled to be so by processes in our central...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (1-2): 185–189.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of extension it constitutes. Replying to Lucien Goldmann in the discussion following his paper and Roland Barthes's, Todorov seems to be making this kind of point: "Of course, man does not only speak, but he is the only creature who speaks, while there are many others who eat" (148-49). Now, as I was waiting...