1-20 of 259 Search Results for

court

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (3): 389–408.
Published: 01 December 2021
...Emma Herdman Abstract A Renaissance querelle was primarily litigious. As such, it was heavily gendered: women, who were culturally expected to be conciliatory, not argumentative, were excluded from the law courts. This article uses the example of Madeleine des Roches—a widow, and so legally...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 87–111.
Published: 01 May 2022
.... This novel seems at first glance to be a fairly straightforward satire of the excesses of the court of Henri III of France (r. 1574–1589). Yet the banquet scene evokes the flexibility of diet and of other aspects of the Galenic regimen in the profusion and variety of food presented. In linking the practices...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 233–253.
Published: 01 January 2012
... l'oisivete, et on etait toujours occupe des plaisirs ou des intrigues. Ambition and gallantry were the sole occupation of the court, busying men and women alike. There were so many interests and so many different intrigues in which women took part that love was always mingled with politics, and politics...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 297–315.
Published: 01 May 2008
... with different aims. (viii) Audience and readers. Many sections of the earliest works were clearly addressed to an imaginary court and intended to be read by powerful elites. Intellectuals thereby hoped to enhance their careers as men of letters and to promote their works within a highly-competitive book market...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 859–861.
Published: 01 November 2010
...-Mejean has given us no more than an erudite assemblage of citations. Perhaps a better method would have been to proceed chronologically, from Aquitanian court culture to what the first troubadours took from Latin culture and preaching, followed by the parallel analysis of the poetry's internal tradition...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (1-2): 23–43.
Published: 01 January 2013
... to condemn the woman from her own utterances and actions, with little regard for her examination in the court. On this point, Freeman refers to the "shameful confession" (298) elicited from her by the sages hum, while Jorgensen mentions the wife's "admission of guilt prompted in part by the king's torture...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2011) 102 (1-2): 3–25.
Published: 01 January 2011
... and earns the love of the royal court for his exemplary courtesy. When he eventually tries to attack his wife's new husband and successfully tears off his wife's nose, his uncharacteristic violence is immediately attributed to a desire for vengeance. Under torture, the wife confesses her treachery, returns...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (3-4): 409–426.
Published: 01 May 2012
... and the blame that might result from a controversial position. See Kelly, Rousseau as Author, 8-28. The traditionally relatively separate cultures of the republic of letters, the court, and the salon, as Antoine Lilti has demonstrated, were actually intricately, even programmatically interwoven in the new salon...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (3-4): 189–197.
Published: 01 May 2013
... music-mainly as a succession of unforgettable photographs of large-eyed victims."6 But beyond that question of fairness in representation, there is a deeper paradox in the treatment of Africa: when "war" is considered in the West-war tout court-Africa does not appear. Books with titles such as War: Ends...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2013) 104 (3-4): 313–331.
Published: 01 May 2013
... is perhaps best known for its publication of D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover (1959) and Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer (1961). Lady Chatterley's Lover was banned from the mails; Tropic of Cancer was prosecuted as obscene in over sixty court battles from 1961 to 1964 (McCord vii-x). The lawyer...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 823–838.
Published: 01 November 2010
.... Marie's Lanval tells the story of a knight at Arthur's court overlooked by the king and envied for his good looks and prowess by his fellow 7. My use of expropriation in what follows owes a large debt to Kaja Silverman's inflection of Heidegger's "expropriative appropriation" in World Spectators (Stanford...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 363–380.
Published: 01 May 2008
... seventeenth-century identity crisis of the noblesse d'epee who, by the end of that period, were no longer called upon to embark on military missions, but rather were sequestered at court (Nerlich cited by Seifert 152). 5. Seifert cites the contractual "give and take" that occurs between the storytellers...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 857–859.
Published: 01 November 2010
... of the learned Aquitanian courts and of musical monasteries such as Saint Martial de Limoges. Many troubadours were educated in Latin grammar schools, where at least one returned as a teacher. More than a few were clerks and canons, statuses that some abandoned and others maintained as they pursued artistic...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 37–64.
Published: 01 May 2022
... illness. Doctors summoned to court say that they are unable to identify his malady, provided that he has been able to eat whatever he wants: Cil li firent mires venir pur saver s’il peüst guarir. Li mire sunt tut esguaré, n’unt rien [ne] veü ne trové qu’il eüst mal que li neüst, si mangers a talent...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2007) 98 (4): 532–535.
Published: 01 November 2007
... de la peinture et de la photographie. En revanche, on ignore generalement qu'il s'est aussi essaye a l'ecriture cinematographique, en redigeant notamment, a partir de son roman Triptyque, publie en 1973, Ie scenario d'un court-metrage. De ce dernier, commande par la television allemande, sera tire un...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2008) 99 (3-4): 239–256.
Published: 01 May 2008
... in the early decades of the eighteenth century. Curiously, it was not a study of Madame de Lafayette, or Charles Perrault, nor even Montesquieu or Antoine Galland. The subject of Melvin Delmar Palmer's dissertation, entitled Madame d'Aulnoy in England, was the infamous countess at the court of Louis XIV who...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2002) 93 (4): 387–413.
Published: 01 November 2002
... of the dominant classes, an access which their absence of status more readily affords them than others.] Poets are able to circulate freely from one milieu to the next, from the taverns to the court, from the court to aristocratic salons, and from aristocratic salons 7. Major 182-184. 8. ]ouhaud 20. THEOPHILE'S...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 709–725.
Published: 01 November 2010
... painter AnnaDorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch. Recently arrived in Paris, she had gained a solid reputation as a portrait and history painter at the court of Frederick II, at the elegant and libertine court of Duke Carl Eugen in Stuttgart, and at the court of the Elector Palatine in Mannheim. In January 1767...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2007) 98 (4): 323–341.
Published: 01 November 2007
... at court, the jealous Duchess revengefully reminds the lady of Vergi that no love is so secret as never to be revealed, just as a little dog will always betray its presence by barking. Knowing her secret disclosed, the lady retires in a small room where, after a long lamentation against love, she dies...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2004) 95 (4): 426–427.
Published: 01 November 2004
... proviennent d'horizons diversd'universitaires-chercheurs de neuf pays, et des plus connus, comme James Lawler, Michel Jarrety et Jiirgen Schmidt-Radefeldt, mais aussi de medecins, d'un biologiste, et meme d'un prix Nobel de chimie. Les etudes, toutes tres courtes (la plus longue occupe neuf pages), ont ete...