1-6 of 6 Search Results for

Philippe de Thaon

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 128–150.
Published: 01 May 2020
... of language in the modes of existence. Copyright © 2020 by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York 2020 Bruno Latour medieval bestiaries Philippe de Thaon language sound Le mot “signe” n’a pas de contraire auquel on puisse l’opposer—et surtout pas le mot “chose.” Si du...
FIGURES
Image
Published: 01 May 2020
figure 1. Chapter on the lion in Philippe de Thaon’s Bestiaire , with image of the lion tearing the ass apart. Copenhagen, Royal Library 3466, fols. 4v and 5r. More
Image
Published: 01 May 2020
figure 2. Chapter on the lion in Philippe de Thaon’s Bestiaire , with image of the lion’s reaction to the noises of the cockerel and the cart (top left). Merton 249, fol. 2v. Reproduced with permission of the Warden and Fellows of Merton College Oxford. More
Image
Published: 01 May 2020
figure 3. Chapter on the lion in Philippe de Thaon’s Bestiaire , with image of the lion’s reaction to the noises of the cockerel and the cart. Copenhagen, Royal Library 3466, fol. 10r. More
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 May 2020
... as either celebrations or refusals of the consequences of its ontology for human beings. In “Sound and Vision: Bruno Latour and the Languages of Philippe de Thaon’s Bestiaire ,” Campbell uses the earliest extant French bestiary as a medieval illustration of Latour’s premise that the material...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 192–203.
Published: 01 May 2020
... comes Emma Campbell’s “Sound and Vision: Bruno Latour and the Languages of Philippe de Thaon’s Bestiaire .” Campbell begins by emphasizing that Latour’s flat ontology helps us to efface the usual distinction between signs and things. Her interpretation of Latour is rock solid like the others...