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Inferno 28

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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 85–96.
Published: 01 May 2021
...Francesco Marco Aresu Abstract This article hypothesizes an intertextual relationship between the literary transfiguration of Occitan troubadour Bertran de Born in Inferno 28 and a fragment of Latin poetry preserved by late antique scholars (and disputedly attributed to Roman poet Ennius...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 May 2021
... career. His kind of study, here of the possible resonance of Quintus Ennius in the episode of Bertran de Born in Inferno 28, requires a learned eye and ear that few possess. A Calabrian poet (b. 239 BC) with a refined knowledge of Oscan, Latin, and Greek who set up shop in Rome, Ennius is still known...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 73–84.
Published: 01 May 2021
... forse a quel che sarà di Paradiso xxv , 73 –, un canto capace di sgombrare la nebbia intellettuale che con forza d’urto tutta umana ancora fiede Dante ( Purg. xxviii , 90, esattamente come il dolce lume del vivere sulla terra evocato da Cavalcante nel canto x dell’ Inferno ), 28...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of Lamentations 1.12 in Inferno 28, 130-32, and in 30, 58-61, for Bertram dal Bornio and Maestro Adamo should also be noted; these bring out the self-regarding and egotistical implications of the plea, and Inferno as mourning. ALLEGORY AND THE 'VITA NUOVA' 87 Though the sonnet following the observation...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 97–119.
Published: 01 May 2021
... control at the time of Guido’s death, Cesena, is described by Dante as languishing between tyranny and freedom ( Inf. 27.51). The content of the pilgrim’s response in Inferno 27 was historicized by Torraca in 1901, and by Arnaldi in 1995. 28 Based on the information provided by Arnaldi...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 39–61.
Published: 01 May 2021
... issue. The same desire informs Dante’s adoption of one of Aristotle’s examples of being compelled from Nicomachean Ethics 3.1, which Dante uses to construct his contrapasso for the circle of lust. But the issue of love as compulsive was important to Dante long before he reached Inferno 5, from...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 120–137.
Published: 01 May 2021
.... As for the principal text of Beinecke 428, Dante’s Commedia , we notice how quite frequently verses become hypermetrical with the addition of vowels at the end of words, specific variants, or, simply, different spellings of individual words. Two notable examples are Inferno 1, v. 4, which in Beinecke 428 reads “Et...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 158–180.
Published: 01 May 2021
... transcribed the canticle onto units of gatherings, or fascicles, beginning both Purgatorio and Paradiso on a new set of fascicles: inferno cc. 1–8 (a quaternion, fasc. 1) cc. 9–16 (a quaternion, fasc. 2) cc. 17–24 (a quaternion, fasc. 3) cc. 25–28 (a binion, fasc. 4; c. 28 blank...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 48–65.
Published: 01 May 2020
... this mission. 1. On dating these works, see Holloway; and Inglese. On the Rettorica - Tresor relationship, see Keen 4–5, 9. Paradoxically, the Rettorica receives what is probably its strongest, most tencione -creating contemporary engagement from Dante. In Inferno XV, the Dante persona...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (3): 425–444.
Published: 01 May 2010
... Sonderkommando incinerating the bodies of their brethren. The figuration of the Sonderkommando and SS recalls Dante's damned Thieves entwined, bound, and penetrated by snakes in Inferno, cantos XXIV and XXV. Although Levi cannot comprehend the otherness of the SS, he nevertheless renders judgment of them via...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2023) 114 (1): 189–205.
Published: 01 May 2023
... , Dante Alighieri imagined himself conversing with the illustrious authors of the past. As his Pilgrim is wandering through the dark wood in the famous opening canto of Inferno , he espies “one who seemed faint because of long silence” (1.63), 34 and he cries out, “Have pity on me . . . , whatever you...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2014) 105 (3-4): 175–186.
Published: 01 May 2014
... imagined in increasingly lengthy conversations. At the end, the actual penitents are presented as if they were works of art who nonetheless seem to speak." What strikes me is when Proust refers to Dante, he most often evokes the Inferno in somewhat offhand or ironic references, but always as the great...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 67–84.
Published: 01 January 2005
... allegory is overlaid with simile. Nautical imagery pervades the Commedia, and this example from near the end of Purgatorio stands in archetectonic balance to the comparison of the giant Antaeus to a mast being raised in Inferno (31.145) and Dante's wonder at the universal form being likened to Neptune's...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 65–86.
Published: 01 May 2022
... (On Making Distinctions in Matters of Love): Inferno 5 in Its Lyric and Autobiographical Context .” In Barolini , Dante and the Origins 70 – 101 . Barolini Teodolinda . Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture . New York : Fordham University Press , 2006 . Barolini...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2011) 102 (1-2): 91–108.
Published: 01 January 2011
... form. Rather, they "exacerbate the antipathy of the living to the significant by exposing the violence entailed in transforming the one into the other" (24). Teskey singles out the episode in the Inferno when Francesca da Rimini (just as much a once-living woman as Machaut would have us believe Toute...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 423–443.
Published: 01 May 2006
... has found its end in a mass of tears that has frozen the swarming cries into "mute crystals," which, conversely, recalls that of the traitors of their guests in the third ring of the lowest circle of hell, where the eyes of the damned are sealed by frozen tears (Inferno XXXIII. 91-150). If the city...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 309–330.
Published: 01 May 2006
... vernaculars to their own. According to Andre Pezard, this linguistic perversion was reason enough for Dante to condemn Brunetto Latini in the Inferno for a kind of literary sodomy.34 Even after Dante's Commedia had affirmed once and for all the strength and possibilities of the Italian vernacular, some...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 839–855.
Published: 01 November 2010
...), "Se avemo eu <;oie, or ne reven in plant," a Inferno 26.136, "Noi ci allegrammo, e tosto torna in pianto," esprimendo il suo dubbio che si tratti di una "casuale coincidenza" ("A proposito" 749). Innanzitutto, questa eco dantesca Ie suggerisce che almeno "Berta e Milan [si debba] collocare nel sec...