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Inferno 27

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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 97–119.
Published: 01 May 2021
... of tyrants provided by the pilgrim in Inferno 27. It examines how Dante held Guido accountable for the intensification of warfare in Romagna and made an argument for the responsibility of military strategists in the consolidation of urban signorie . Dante’s assessment coincides with current historiography...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 39–61.
Published: 01 May 2021
... issue. The same desire informs Dante’s adoption of one of Aristotle’s examples of being compelled from Nicomachean Ethics 3.1, which Dante uses to construct his contrapasso for the circle of lust. But the issue of love as compulsive was important to Dante long before he reached Inferno 5, from...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 73–84.
Published: 01 May 2021
... dell’incontro fra Dante e Brunetto in Inferno. Mentre per gli esempi di retardatio propri ai canti della serie edenica e la generale loro condizione di iper-temporale fisicità si può guardare ancora a Ciccuto, “Origini poetiche e figurative”, 73, n. 27. 31. Per l’episodio relativo a Romolo...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 62–72.
Published: 01 May 2021
... Convivio con i primi canti dell’ Inferno grazie a svariati riscontri di carattere lessicale tra i due testi (Petrocchi 230–31). Petrocchi infatti identifica una corrispondenza già dal primo verso della Commedia , «Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita»: l’uomo che dice io nell’opera, il personaggio-poeta...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 120–137.
Published: 01 May 2021
.... As for the principal text of Beinecke 428, Dante’s Commedia , we notice how quite frequently verses become hypermetrical with the addition of vowels at the end of words, specific variants, or, simply, different spellings of individual words. Two notable examples are Inferno 1, v. 4, which in Beinecke 428 reads “Et...
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Journal Article
Romanic Review (2021) 112 (1): 158–180.
Published: 01 May 2021
... sets aside spaces of eleven to thirteen transcriptional lines, and up to twenty-nine lines (c. 27 recto and verso), an average size of approximately 65 x 85 mm, usually with three red borders. Of these 175 planned “narrative illuminations,” the Inferno (fascs. 1–4) contains the largest number...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 January 2005
... a widow, never, in the Vita Nuova, named Florence, though alluded to four times in this chapter. "Godi, Fiorenza"-the ironic opening to Inferno 26.1-tells Florence to rejoice, but there, as here, mourning is more fitting. 3 Passing through the middle, the pilgrims divide and fragment the city, making...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2001) 92 (4): 491–511.
Published: 01 November 2001
... through Auschwitz. In addition, aware of the vast critical tradition, Levi knows that canto XXVI of the Inferno has evoked impassioned and contradictory interpretations. Levi may declare that verses 118-120 from Inferno XXVI ("Considerate la vostra semenza: / Fatti non foste a viver come bruti, / Ma per...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2020) 111 (1): 85–105.
Published: 01 May 2020
... that God will enable its poet (“makere”) to yet produce a comedy before he dies (“Ther God thi makere yet, er that he dye, / So sende myght to make in some comedye”). This reference to the Troilus as “myn tragedye” echoes the twentieth canto of Dante’s Inferno , in which Virgil characterizes his Aeneid...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2023) 114 (1): 189–205.
Published: 01 May 2023
... , Dante Alighieri imagined himself conversing with the illustrious authors of the past. As his Pilgrim is wandering through the dark wood in the famous opening canto of Inferno , he espies “one who seemed faint because of long silence” (1.63), 34 and he cries out, “Have pity on me . . . , whatever you...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2007) 98 (4): 481–503.
Published: 01 November 2007
... raccroche Le passant." (del poema cCles sept vieillards 63. Cf. "Inferno", III, 55-57: "si Iunga tratta di gente, ch'io non avrei mai creduto que morte tanta n'avesse disfatta". tan gran multitud/ de gente, que nunca hubiera creido/ que la muerte hubiera deshecho a tantos.) 64. Cf. "Inferno", IV, 25-27...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2012) 103 (1-2): 255–272.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., in which a calculating lesbian seduces a vulnerable young woman and persuades her to kill her husband. If Nicole recalls Hauteclaire in terms of film 2, in film 1 she is a reincarnation of Ines Serrano, part of the inferno trio in Jean-Paul Sartre's Huis elos, which premiered with great success in 1944...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2005) 96 (1): 67–84.
Published: 01 January 2005
... allegory is overlaid with simile. Nautical imagery pervades the Commedia, and this example from near the end of Purgatorio stands in archetectonic balance to the comparison of the giant Antaeus to a mast being raised in Inferno (31.145) and Dante's wonder at the universal form being likened to Neptune's...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2022) 113 (1): 65–86.
Published: 01 May 2022
... (On Making Distinctions in Matters of Love): Inferno 5 in Its Lyric and Autobiographical Context .” In Barolini , Dante and the Origins 70 – 101 . Barolini Teodolinda . Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture . New York : Fordham University Press , 2006 . Barolini...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 423–443.
Published: 01 May 2006
... has found its end in a mass of tears that has frozen the swarming cries into "mute crystals," which, conversely, recalls that of the traitors of their guests in the third ring of the lowest circle of hell, where the eyes of the damned are sealed by frozen tears (Inferno XXXIII. 91-150). If the city...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2006) 97 (3-4): 309–330.
Published: 01 May 2006
... vernaculars to their own. According to Andre Pezard, this linguistic perversion was reason enough for Dante to condemn Brunetto Latini in the Inferno for a kind of literary sodomy.34 Even after Dante's Commedia had affirmed once and for all the strength and possibilities of the Italian vernacular, some...
Journal Article
Romanic Review (2010) 101 (4): 839–855.
Published: 01 November 2010
...), "Se avemo eu <;oie, or ne reven in plant," a Inferno 26.136, "Noi ci allegrammo, e tosto torna in pianto," esprimendo il suo dubbio che si tratti di una "casuale coincidenza" ("A proposito" 749). Innanzitutto, questa eco dantesca Ie suggerisce che almeno "Berta e Milan [si debba] collocare nel sec...