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women artists

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 229–236.
Published: 01 October 2022
... or names something that already exists. Afropolitanism is a recognition of the positive of African descent and the result of years of anti-colonial actions. aniovaprandy@gmail.com Copyright © 2022 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2022 decolonial art Caribbean art women...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (136): 185–197.
Published: 01 January 2020
...Elizabeth Quay Hutchison Abstract In a summer 2018 interview conducted for this special issue of RHR , the US-born lesbian feminist artist, activist, and scholar Margaret Randall reflects on the Cuban Revolution’s achievements and shortcomings in the arena of women’s and sexuality rights. What have...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (136): 169–184.
Published: 01 January 2020
..., aspects of capitalism, imperialism, interpersonal relationships, family and women’s reproductive rights, and culture. Ultimately, it demonstrates that OSPAAAL used artistic production as a tool of political dialogue. Copyright © 2020 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2020...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (1985) 1985 (32): 128.
Published: 01 January 1985
..., is the author of Realism (Penguin), of a study of Courbet, and of articles including ”Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” She did the catalog Women Artists 1550-2950 with Ann Sutherland Harris. ROY ROSENZWEIG, author of Eight Hours for What We Will: Work- ers and Leisure...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1994) 1994 (58): 182–187.
Published: 01 January 1994
.... For example, the most popular room of the show con- tained the powerful, sometimk shocking, works by the Mexican women artists Frida Kahlo and Maria Izquierdo; it was also one of the smallest. When we were there, patrons crowded several layers deep in front of the paintings in this cramped space...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1994) 1994 (58): 183–187.
Published: 01 January 1994
.... For example, the most popular room of the show con- tained the powerful, sometimk shocking, works by the Mexican women artists Frida Kahlo and Maria Izquierdo; it was also one of the smallest. When we were there, patrons crowded several layers deep in front of the paintings in this cramped space...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2002) 2002 (82): 221–222.
Published: 01 January 2002
..., London, England. Her thesis “Translating Exile” explored issues of identity surrounding Iranian women artists. She has worked in various public and private galleries in both Canada and the United Kingdom and is currently living in Toronto where she focuses on writing and curating...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1991) 1991 (51): 132–137.
Published: 01 October 1991
..., and the spectacle of the mass procession to build support for women's suf- frage. In particular, she demonstrates how suffrage artists transformed mainstream images of Edwardian culture into bearers of profeminist messages. Although The Spettacle of Women celebrates the achieve- ments of suffrage artists...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2002) 2002 (82): 208–214.
Published: 01 January 2002
.... As chic commodities, both post- colonial discourse and “Iranian Women Artists” can be packaged together in a happy marriage of “Identity in Art” that make us feel like good Westerners sensitively exploring global understanding and inclusiveness. There is always the danger of the who superseding...
Image
Published: 01 October 2018
Figures 3 and 4. Chris Killip, Woman in Bus Shelter and Women in Bus Stop , 1976. In Flagrante , plates 6 and 47. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist, © Chris Killip More
Image
Published: 01 October 2018
Figures 3 and 4. Chris Killip, Woman in Bus Shelter and Women in Bus Stop , 1976. In Flagrante , plates 6 and 47. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist, © Chris Killip More
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (125): 179–186.
Published: 01 May 2016
...-­centered exhibitions.4 None included a single work referencing women’s sports (even as three featured work by women artists). Without an antisegregationist commitment from the insti- tution, the sports world represented inside the museum can be even more gender exclusive than that encountered...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (145): 165–180.
Published: 01 January 2023
... involved. We also look at Latin American women artists such as Carolina Caycedo, María Evelia Marmolejo (Colombia), Cecilia Vicuña (Chile), and Regina José Galindo (Guatemala), whose work focuses on the intersection between resistance to extractivism and patriarchy, inspired by Indigenous cosmovisions...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (149): 44–47.
Published: 01 May 2024
... of a female name biases women’s judgments of women artists. 2 The most fertile ground for understanding the consequences of both internalized and institutionalized branding of women, however, was outside the academy in feminist consciousness-raising and radical therapy groups. By comparing notes, we women...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1994) 1994 (60): 77–87.
Published: 01 October 1994
... ownership-authorship. Designers of today’s monuments might reflect on the relation- ships (both potential and realized) between artists’ collaboratives and political collectives, to explore trends in contemporary art (ape cially among such important groups of producers as women artists...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (126): 181–193.
Published: 01 October 2016
... of colonial violence. Her images remain a poignant relic of conquest. 33. Lisa Gail Collins, The Art of History: African American Women Artists Engage the Past (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002), 13. 34. Beth Fowkes Tobin, Picturing Imperial Power: Colonial Subjects in Eighteenth...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2003) 2003 (86): 1–6.
Published: 01 May 2003
... important works. Negar Mottahedeh reviews multimedia works by two Iranian-born women artists, Shirin Neshat and Gita Hashemi, who in very different ways have explored the centrality of gender in Muslim societies in general (in the works of the former...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (142): 152–168.
Published: 01 January 2022
... encouraged in academia. We’re encouraged to stay in our lane, more or less—even if this mandate is largely unspoken: Black artists tend to be the domain of African American scholars, women artists the domain of female scholars, and so on. Though, I would say white scholars generally have (or they more...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1981) 1981 (25): 101–113.
Published: 01 January 1981
..., a D.C.physician who was the first woman to earn a medical degree west of the Alleghenies. And as the tour points out, the NWP commissioned women artists for the portraits, sculpture, and design of their head- quarters. MARTHA WASHINGTON TO ALICE PAUL 111...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1997) 1997 (68): 4–24.
Published: 01 May 1997
... Honey In The Rock. I was inside of a community of black women, and we were singing in front of audiences. That could be a struggle too because during the same period we were singing in front of black audiences and especially women audiences that were not accustomed to black women artists. So we...