1-10 of 10 Search Results for

mughal

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2018) 2018 (132): 200–207.
Published: 01 October 2018
... experience of troops in Burma. The images described in this brief article reveal a very different face of African overseas military service: they depict a group of soldiers visiting the Taj Mahal and encountering the Mughal monument. Although published and choreographed by the British, these images reflect a...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1994) 1994 (59): 190–194.
Published: 01 May 1994
... Indian history once designated simply as "Muslim" was one of generalized social chaos. John Richards' contribution to the New Cambridge History of India considers the final two hundred years of that period, when the Timurid dynasty of the Mughal emperors extended its effective political...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1994) 1994 (59): 1–3.
Published: 01 May 1994
... Book section, Michael Sprinker reviews the latest volume of The New Cambridge History of India, examining the nature of the precolonial social formation that the British encountered, the proxi- mate causes of the Mughal Empire's break-up, and the classic ques- tion of whether the...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2005) 2005 (92): 175–183.
Published: 01 May 2005
... nineteenth century Persian served as the administrative and intellectual lingua franca in territories under Mughal con- trol and beyond—prior to the emergence of nation-centered modernities that cast “a purely self-congratulatory view of European civilization as the...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2010) 2010 (108): 91–116.
Published: 01 October 2010
... capitals in the area. The last, Shajahanabad, built in the seven- teenth century by the Mughal emperor Shajahan, continued to be one of northern India’s largest and most important cities.4 Though it had lost much of its luster in the past 150 years, Delhi, unlike Calcutta, continued to be regarded as...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2005) 2005 (92): 118–132.
Published: 01 May 2005
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1998) 1998 (71): 150–163.
Published: 01 May 1998
... absent in the other great empires (Manchu and Ming, Ottoman, and Mughal) fueling such growth. Switching gears both methodological- ly and geographically, we then turned from macrohistory to micro- history: Inga Clendinnen’s Aztecs. The objective was, pace Wolf, to recover, if possible, the...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1993) 1993 (56): 85–98.
Published: 01 May 1993
...- pendency was couched in violence, the kamias offered dispersed and symbolic resistance, and the maliks rendered various kinds of assistance in return. In the eighteenth century, however, the com- mercialization of agriculture was well underway in Mughal India. The East India Company's Permanent...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2002) 2002 (83): 146–172.
Published: 01 May 2002
...? Why should we so reflexively assume that the reformist spirit in 19th-century India derived its strength primarily from Enlightenment sources? We know that long before Bentinck, the Mughals as well as many major and minor Hindu rulers did...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2007) 2007 (99): 158–172.
Published: 01 October 2007
... followers, and his allies (some Muslim) were increasingly in conflict with the Mughal authorities. Though the Guru moved on, the mixed population remained until the Partition of 1947 split Punjab in two and divided the population along religious lines. Most Muslims in East Punjab moved west to...