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maori

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1999) 1999 (75): 80–91.
Published: 01 October 1999
... Zealand” is what is on display; it is a flourishing national culture that has been achieved, a triumph of cultural independence. Yet, relations between the indigenous Maori and Pakeha (literally non-Maori) peoples-the central issue of ”race” in the soci- ety-is fundamental to the museum’s physical...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1999) 1999 (75): 79.
Published: 01 October 1999
... issue with an essay by Charlotte J. Macdonald. Macdonald examines how the history of the conquest of the Maori and South Pacific peoples is incorporated into New Zealand’s long awaited national museum in Wellington. To date, subsequent issues will feature comparable studies of Australia, South...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2005) 2005 (92): 175–183.
Published: 01 May 2005
... in the nineteenth century was also extended by a number of amateur and profes- sional philologists and ethnologists to the Maori population of New Zealand, among other groups—was also adopted after the late eighteenth century by a number of Irish Celticist...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2010) 2010 (107): 195–208.
Published: 01 May 2010
...) — respecting no indigenous prop- erty rights at all and distributing the land freely among settlers. In contrast, Native peoples of the other six regions, and especially the Maori of New Zealand and the Polynesians of Fiji and Tonga, practiced very well-established and highly developed forms of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1999) 1999 (73): 147–152.
Published: 01 January 1999
... devel- oper, co-facilitated the daily four-hour classes with me. We looked for ways to encourage the class to hear not just the speakers, but each other’s indigenous voices. Each day we began with a spiritual opening- sometimes a Hawaiian chant, a moment of silence, a Haka (Maori...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1998) 1998 (71): 164–181.
Published: 01 May 1998
... lines while reinforcing class hierar- chies. The choice between the Maori Wars and sati is not an easy one, for both provide excellent material for a class discussion, yet to include both would mean removing a section later from the sched- ule. Likely I will have to experiment further with...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1985) 1985 (33): 165–181.
Published: 01 May 1985
... now Ghana, who himself created some- thing of a sensation in his tour of Harlem). Finally, a show on the Maori art of New Zealand at the Metropolitan Museum began with a spectacular celebration by Maori priests. The crowds were clearly impressed, and there has been no shortage of critical...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1999) 1999 (73): 117–127.
Published: 01 January 1999
..., Though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. American and Indian, Boer and Zulu, Cossack and Tartar, New Zealander and Maori-in each case the victor, horrible though...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1997) 1997 (68): 25–53.
Published: 01 May 1997
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2006) 2006 (96): 112–136.
Published: 01 October 2006
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2015) 2015 (123): 144–175.
Published: 01 October 2015
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2012) 2012 (114): 139–163.
Published: 01 October 2012