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iranian

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 13–38.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Ervand Abrahamian This article analyzes the behavior of street demonstrators in the Iranian Revolution of 1977-79. It tries to show that they acted less like irrational mobs and more like the rational crowds found in George Rude's classic works. It also tries to show that the bloodshed in these...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 39–57.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Hanan Hammad This essay analyzes how the Egyptian press covered the Iranian Revolution and the Khomeini regime in 1978-81. It discusses which issues related to the revolution and the revolutionary regime were covered, as well as the attitudes of different groups of Egyptian politicians and...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 58–78.
Published: 01 October 2009
... in Iranian prerevolutionary political discourse. By reading through the utterances of several Iranian political thinkers and activists from different ideological backgrounds, this essay maintains that all these intellectuals have shown continuity in the line of their reasoning toward Israel over the...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 79–91.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Nima Naghibi This essay argues that the 1979 Iranian Revolution constituted a traumatic break in the national imagination, a break that has paradoxically engendered productive possibilities for women's subjectivities, which manifest themselves through the explosion of diasporic Iranian women's...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2003) 2003 (86): 7–35.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Janet Afary 2003 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization,Inc. 2003 02-Afary.btw 4/16/03 3:04 PM Page 7 Shi‘i Narratives of Karbalâ and Christian Rites of Penance: Michel Foucault and the Culture of the Iranian Revolution...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 2008) 2008 (101): 42–58.
Published: 01 May 2008
...Arzoo Osanloo The U.S. foreign policy program favoring regime change in Iran mobilizes women's rights as a means to garner domestic sympathy for intervention. In doing so, pundits and politicians draw on epistemological assumptions that render Iranian women's lives in binary opposition to those of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 123–131.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Minoo Moallem This essay, whose title makes reference to Gil Scott-Heron's famous song, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” addresses several components of the Iranian Revolution of 1979, meaning the revolution as an event in its singularity, the revolution as experienced by the subjects who...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 93–105.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi Taraneh Hemami was the guest curator of an exhibition she called Theory of Survival at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The exhibition attracted considerable attention from the local media and the Iranian American communities in the Bay Area. The exhibit...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 168–176.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Ali Mirsepassi This essay presents a discussion of intellectual developments in the thirty years since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, along both religious and secular lines, as they have unfolded in the wake of the prerevolutionary heritage of both the constitutional revolution-Popular Front secular...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 139–144.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Djavad Salehi-Isfahani Critics of the Iranian Revolution of 1979 often paint the picture of a failed revolution when they focus on the structure of employment or on income inequality, neither of which indicates improvement or deep social change. I argue here that the critics miss an important...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 156–162.
Published: 01 October 2009
...M. R. Ghanoonparvar With a brief survey of Iranian fiction and film since the early twentieth century, this article reflects on the changes and developments in these two art forms in recent decades. It argues that although serious writers and filmmakers in the past century displayed a commitment to...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 106–121.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi The eight-year Iran-Iraq war (1980-88) profoundly shaped postrevolutionary Iranian society. In the early years, the war united different dominant political factions and contributed to the solidification of the Islamic Republic. Its subsequent legacy, the “blood of martyrs...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 145–150.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Kamran Talattof This essay offers a summary of literary activities since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, pointing out the most important poets, fiction writers, literary critics, literary journals, and literary as well as social events that have affected the production of literary shifts. In so doing...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 151–155.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Persis M. Karim This essay highlights the changes in literature in Iran and in the diaspora since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, and it especially emphasizes the role of literature and writers in responding to the societal changes in Iran, as well as to the experience of immigration to the West. The...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 177–184.
Published: 01 October 2009
...Niki Akhavan This book review compares Mehdi Semati's Media, Culture, and Society in Iran: Living with Globalization and the Islamic State and Nasrin Alavi's We Are Iran: The Persian Blogs . Both works recognize the significance of media in shaping and understanding contemporary Iranian society...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2015) 2015 (121): 51–70.
Published: 01 January 2015
... chants by residents of Iran's densely populated cities shouting “Allah-O-Akbar” from their rooftops. By tracing the roots of this protest tradition, not only in the Iranian revolution of 1979 but also in Shi'a rowzeh khani performance, this essay examines rooftop chanting as an enactment of a counter...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 185–187.
Published: 01 October 2009
... lecturer at Imam Sadiq University (ISU), Tehran. Niki Akhavan received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 2007. Her research is focused on the relationship between new media and transnational Iranian politi- cal and cultural production. She is currently a visiting assistant...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 1–12.
Published: 01 October 2009
... This issue of Radical History Review marks the thirtieth anniversary of the Iranian revolution. The 1979 revolution brought about radical changes in the Iranian politi- cal, social, and cultural institutions, reverberated across the globe, and caused rifts and realignments in international...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2009) 2009 (105): 163–167.
Published: 01 October 2009
... Revolution and the Circulation of Visual Culture Mazyar Lotfalian In April 2008 a work of the celebrated Iranian artist, Parviz Tanavoli, sold for 2.5 million dollars at Christie’s auction in Dubai. The Christie’s catalog referenced the piece as Persopolis, and the artist himself calls it one...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2002) 2002 (82): 208–214.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Gallery/Toronto, January 13–February 17, 2001. While I was viewing the work of Iranian photographer Shadee Ghadirian, a man (non-Iranian) stood beside me. Appearing overwhelmed by her work, he turned to me: “Wow, what irony. It’s not fair. Just not fair. They’re not even allowed to go to school...