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illness

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (94): 155–169.
Published: 01 January 2006
...Kim Hewitt 2006 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc. 2006 TEACHING RADICAL HISTORY Women and Madness: Teaching Mental Illness as a Disability Kim Hewitt Studying disability requires triangulating human impairment as a somatic prob­ lem, a social condition...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (139): 52–74.
Published: 01 January 2021
... the masters’ expectations for care in illness and old age with the slaves’ and former slaves’ expectations for compensation for their work and dedication. Following these uneven relationships of interdependence and exploitation as they developed over time, the article suggests a reassessment of the role...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 143–150.
Published: 01 May 2021
... contributed significantly to a globalized industry, valuing $21 billion in sales by 2017. Although maintaining a blood surplus has been crucial for treating illnesses and traumatic injuries, blood banking has been a source for massive viral transmissions, including HIV and hepatitis C. Examining the news...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1999) 1999 (74): 173–183.
Published: 01 May 1999
..., very strong opinions are generated, and arousing an animated debate takes very little in-class effort. I like to begin class on the first day with the question, ”What is an illness”?The question incites lively discussion, and sets the stage for a number of problems that will be with us...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2001) 2001 (80): 51–75.
Published: 01 May 2001
... and female garment workers faced very different forms of occupational illness. Women’s most common defects involved their gynecological and reproductive sys- Radical History Review Issue 80 (spring 2001): 51–75 Copyright 2001 by MARHO...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (94): 170–182.
Published: 01 January 2006
... to define this topic. Indeed, throughout the course, changing terminology to describe mad people is dis- cussed to understand how language has been used to mark, or reclaim, the identities of those variously described as mad, insane, crazy, lunatic, distracted, mentally ill, survivors, consumers...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1999) 1999 (74): 137–139.
Published: 01 May 1999
... in areas where the least powerful reside. Presiding over all of these debates is the promise of a free market that will cure all ills. What is so often sorely lacking is the language, and the history behind that language, with which to challenge this festering status quo. Thus the history...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2008) 2008 (101): 131–143.
Published: 01 May 2008
... as an encounter with newness, and the body becomes raw material. Breast cancer or illness opens a space of multiple becoming because it desta- bilizes identity and reconstitutes the feminine as raw material. The subject can then deploy multiple strategies as a testimonial to becoming — women, warrior...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1986) 1986 (34): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 1986
..., that many in the new service professions have become subject to the same forces they have attempted to diagnose and treat. This approach to the psychology of work will focus on three related concerns: work stress as a source of mental illness; the use of work as a form of patient therapy...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (139): 166–177.
Published: 01 January 2021
... prohibitive in cost, difficult of [ sic ] access, and exclude chronic degenerative conditions characteristically experienced by aging populations. Present health care delivery systems are oriented toward acute medical illness, and do not encompass preventive medicine, health education, or health maintenance...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (139): 123–144.
Published: 01 January 2021
... primarily on specific concerns affecting individual houses that were geographically close to Cîteaux. 44 Over time, however, the chapter increasingly issued more universal rules and regulations and began to define older abbots who were disabled or chronically ill as unsuitable for leadership...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (94): 191–196.
Published: 01 January 2006
...- ture and Disability,” taught by Susan Schweik, the cochair of Disability Studies at Berkeley, and I realized that such a model could be applied to visual art. Soon after, I began to design a course examining how visual artists have responded to illness and disability. Throughout the course, we...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2005) 2005 (91): 7–12.
Published: 01 January 2005
... to 150,000 survivors are chronically ill. The con- ditions afflicting them range from respiratory problems, deteriorating vision, bodily pain, and weakness to various cancers to reproductive disorders among women and birth defects among children. Some conditions are now appearing in the third gen- eration...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2007) 2007 (99): 140–157.
Published: 01 October 2007
...- ter and worse. The Zulus had various ways of communicating with them, including through dreams and ceremonies. They also employed rainmakers to bring rain and diviners — isangoma or “witch doctors” as the Norwegians called them — to heal ill- ness and to “smell out” the perpetrators of crimes...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 78–106.
Published: 01 May 2021
... like Queens and the Bronx. 5 Today, people who are poor, incarcerated, or otherwise marginalized suffer disproportionately from the risk of new infection and AIDS-related illness, and they lack access to safe and affordable housing, harm-reduction-based treatment, and long-term care. Placing...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1994) 1994 (58): 160–164.
Published: 01 January 1994
... Edward how to hold his cricket bat properly.) Frank, their elder son, also a gifted linguist and poet, who was to die leading an ill-fated Special Operations mission, parachutting into Axis Bulgaria to support the partisans, went to Winchester, but Edward was sent to his father’s old...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1999) 1999 (74): 162–172.
Published: 01 May 1999
... and body were gen- dered in the Enlightenment, we turn to nineteenth-century treatment of mental illness to better understand how Enlightenment ideas were translated into Victorian therapeutics. Elaine Showalter’s The Female Malady, though controversial, remains the best introduction to the rea...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (94): 253–260.
Published: 01 January 2006
... as limitations.”3 Similarly, Rebecca Hoffberger, the director of the museum who has worked as a job trainer at a hospital for the mentally ill, has argued that visionary art is simply a private experience between the “artist and god.”4 But even as the museum struggles to define visionary art with some...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1986) 1986 (34): 3–5.
Published: 01 January 1986
... at work as the measure of mental health; sometimes prescribed work as treatment for mental illness; and, less often, also considered it as a cause of mental disorders. Placing this medical history in its larger context, they argue that changing therapeutics reflected the transformation of work...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2001) 2001 (80): 101–119.
Published: 01 May 2001
... As in these other contexts, in communities like Harlem, the formulation of poverty, segregation, and stigmatized illness compounded the challenges that health educators and doctors faced in preventing tuberculosis. Cheryl Lynn Greenberg’s study of Harlem in the Great...