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household

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1980) 1979-80 (22): 129–139.
Published: 01 January 1980
...James W. Wessman 1979 CONT DEB A Household Mode of Production- An0 t her Comment James W. Wessman Michael Merrill’s recent article on self -sufficiency and exchange in rural United...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1980) 1979-80 (22): 141–146.
Published: 01 January 1980
...Michael Merrill 1979 So What’s Wrong with the ”Household Mode of Production”? Michael Merrill WHY I AM A MARXIST-SCHMARXIST Bam! Stubbornly nondialectical! Sock! Quasi-marxist ! Pow! Romantic! Biff! All that noise you...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1978) 1978 (18): 166–171.
Published: 01 October 1978
...Christopher Clark Copyright September, 1978 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization 1978 The Household Mode of Production-A Comment Christopher Clark Michael Merrill's recent article* provides a much needed focus on crucial problems...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 2014) 2014 (120): 94–107.
Published: 01 October 2014
... to establish a capacious notion of the archive devised and enabled by undocumented queer immigrants' households in New York City. Using ethnographic fieldwork and buoyed by writings in affect theory and material culture studies, this essay aspires to understand how seemingly chaotic and disorderly...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2012) 2012 (112): 100–112.
Published: 01 January 2012
... principle of the economy, making monogamy, domesticity, and partnership conduits for material resources. But as they did so, fewer and fewer working people — and less than half of flight attendants — lived within the boundaries of traditional family, instead organizing their households as single people...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1986) 1986 (35): 7–25.
Published: 01 May 1986
... wage depen- dency. By the late 1870s, the number of people working solely for wages in manufacturing, construction, and transportation alone was almost equivalent to the size of the entire population in 1790.3 The strategies that enabled working-class households to survive the intervening...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1977) 1977 (13): 2.
Published: 01 January 1977
... printed below, Michael Merrill argues that another mode of production, which he calls the "household," can be distinguished from both the petty commodity and the capitalist forms. Citing evidence from the Hudson River Valley during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Merrill...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1977) 1977 (13): 42–71.
Published: 01 January 1977
... 45 crops and manufacture many of its household items rather than specialize in marketable products. This was true of farms near Philadelphia as well as those distant from it.14 why did the farmers of the region not take full advantage of the "gains from trade" that would accrue to them...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1988) 1988 (41): 163–176.
Published: 01 May 1988
..., is the centrality of the household, both as the primary base of production and as the primary focus of economic ac- tivity. The point is not that farm families were completely "self-suf- ficient" or committed to "subsistence"agriculture only. If anything, recent research in rural history has...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1980) 1979-80 (22): 3–5.
Published: 01 January 1980
... activist, provides an interesting counterpoint to Miller's review. For American radical historians few subjects are more important than the transition in this country from precapitalist to capitalist society. In RHR 15 Michael Merrill claimed to have discovered a household mode of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1975) 1975 (9-10): 30–43.
Published: 01 October 1975
... re-introduction of private plots, the policy encouraging individual households to re-open wasteland for private cultivation, the de-collectivization of side• line enterprises and the re-opening of rural trade fairs were hardly "T'aoist" deviations from a socialist norm. In 1960, these...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1989) 1989 (44): 152–158.
Published: 01 May 1989
... Stansell’s book, City of Women, is the first study which analyzes the impact of this process on women. Stan- sell argues clearly and persuasively that the growing uncertainty of male employment eroded older patterns of male authority in the household, diminished family resources for domestic...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1979) 1979 (20): 76–84.
Published: 01 May 1979
.... The Parsonian framework implicit in many works of family history has been loosely and variously defined, and in recent years modified and stretched.’ But the frequently unfocused fixation of family historians on household size and fertility to the detriment of emotional patterns...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1979) 1979 (21): 131–148.
Published: 01 October 1979
...- ing and how these changes revealed changing social relations among households. In this way, re-walking the walking city through time, I hope to suggest, albeit schematically, how we can begin to grasp the relation of space to class. I In seventeenth and...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1998) 1998 (70): 26–47.
Published: 01 January 1998
..., howev- er, was that marriage had given Julian access to crucial economic resources. Maria Josefa Gomez, his wife, had brought to their mar- riage ”twenty sheep, two adult cows, two bulls and a calf,” as well as other unnamed goods (probably household items and cloth- ing) listed in two...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1998) 1998 (70): 27–47.
Published: 01 January 1998
..., howev- er, was that marriage had given Julian access to crucial economic resources. Maria Josefa Gomez, his wife, had brought to their mar- riage ”twenty sheep, two adult cows, two bulls and a calf,” as well as other unnamed goods (probably household items and cloth- ing) listed in two...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1979) 1979 (21): 151–168.
Published: 01 October 1979
... disrupted. This was the context for the 1904-1906 conflicts. Moreover, we should not dismiss these conflicts because they developed outside the strict realm of "production," in the supposedly "private" realm of the household. This attitude ignores the generally close relation between the two realms...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 October 1978) 1978 (18): 95–96.
Published: 01 October 1978
... production moved from household to factory to office. But we also showed the continuities in women's work by depicting in each period their housework and domestic employment as well. Our intention throughout was to uncover not only the variety of women's work but also the relation of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 1998) 1998 (70): 175–180.
Published: 01 January 1998
... aspirations would center on gaining parliamentary representation for working men, as heads of households, rather than addressing the legitimate demands of women or families. The narrative that emerges from these two volumes is relatively coherent. It starts with the development of political...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 May 1986) 1986 (35): 49–56.
Published: 01 May 1986
... once significant and problematic. Exploring new ground in her discussion of the economic status and behavior of free black women, she finds that “over half the free black households were headed by women,” and, that black women (like white propertied widows) seemed to bypass marriage -or at...