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decolonial art

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 229–236.
Published: 01 October 2022
... or names something that already exists. Afropolitanism is a recognition of the positive of African descent and the result of years of anti-colonial actions. aniovaprandy@gmail.com Copyright © 2022 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2022 decolonial art Caribbean art women...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (136): 169–184.
Published: 01 January 2020
...Lani Hanna Abstract The Tricontinental Conference in 1966 in Havana, Cuba, marked a moment of particular import for the development of an internationalism grounded in anti-imperialist and decolonial solidarity. Tricontinental took place at the height of crisis for many nations fighting...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (145): 125–138.
Published: 01 January 2023
... Mufulira’s residents lacked the ability to address toxicity’s root causes, they did find ways to live with it—albeit in circumstances not of their own choosing. Approaches from decolonial ecology might allow us to better uncover such “arts of living on a damaged planet.” 26 While Mwamba and his fellow...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 77–105.
Published: 01 October 2022
... diaspora that is developing decolonial methodologies that do not neatly fit in the confines of the Afropolitan, especially when it comes to class and migration. 53. Arboleda, “María Gertrudis de León,” 118 . 54. González, “La defensa de una mujer afrodescendiente,” 133–71 . 55. Sánchez...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (126): 194–196.
Published: 01 October 2016
... at Michigan State University. As a scholar-­activist her research brings together women of color and decolonial feminisms, sexuality studies, and Afro-­Latinx/diasporic religion and philosophies in an effort to explore alternative grounds for the (re)making of social relations, histories, intimacies...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 107–141.
Published: 01 May 2021
... AIDS activists enacted a queer and feminist decolonial activism that looked past the continental United States to the global South. In Puerto Rico, Latinx AIDS activists helped establish the first chapter of ACT UP in a Spanish-speaking country. Together, the Latina/o Caucus and ACT UP/Puerto Rico...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (145): 165–180.
Published: 01 January 2023
..., while contributing to challenge the power structures in which these operate. francescomartone1@gmail.com rosajijon@gmail.com Copyright © 2023 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2023 ecofeminism rights of nature Indigenous peoples contemporary art Art...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 1–18.
Published: 01 October 2022
... contributors tend to coalesce and overlap along three key lines of critical inquiry: visual culture, narrativity, and intersectionality. Their approaches to these themes are diverse yet very much in dialogue. For example, the authors critically examine images occurring in historical art, photography, and mixed...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 106–130.
Published: 01 October 2022
... and political Afro-Brazilian movement in the 1970s and 1980s. Articulated by Abdias Nascimento, quilombismo represented an Afrocentric revolutionary worldview that sought Black liberation and novel “cognitive maps of the future.” 16 Through art, aesthetics, religiosity, and cultural memory, Nascimento...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 19–44.
Published: 01 October 2022
..., “Croisières à la côte d’Afrique,” 241–81 . 68. Bay, Wives of the Leopard , 11 . 69. Blier, “Art of Assemblage,” 202 . 70. Snelgrave, New Account , 79–80 . See also Norris, Memoirs of Bossa Ahádee , 102–3. 71. Forbes, Dahomey and the Dahomans , 2:214 . 72. Burton...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 2024
... organizers’ work increased in tandem with government officials’ neglect, the complexity and quality of their art increased, evidencing how their access to self-expression was hard-won. Incarcerated women in the maximum security wing of the Federal Correctional Institution, Marianna, summarized...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (142): 72–92.
Published: 01 January 2022
... (hereafer, File 279/1968). 2. Drager, “Looking after Mrs. G” ; Fernández-Galeano, “Performing Queer Archives” ; Tortorici, “Decolonial Archival Imaginaries.” 3. These are the pseudonyms that I use for them in accordance with Spanish privacy protection laws, which also forbid...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 1–8.
Published: 01 May 2021
... on by Visual AIDS, an organization that “utilizes art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue, supporting HIV+ artists, and preserving a legacy, because AIDS is not over.” 16 These pieces provocatively blur the boundary between past and present through the use of video captured by AIDS activists during...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (145): 1–11.
Published: 01 January 2023
... of ecocide? This issue of Radical History Review is dedicated to examining such alternatives to the Anthropocene. Much valuable work is currently being carried out to imagine present and future ways of being “beyond the world’s end,” in the words of art historian T. J. Demos. 25 Militant ecocriticism...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 130–153.
Published: 01 January 2024
... of transformative justice that rejects violence and the understanding that transformation might not come without injury to those who do violence on behalf of the state. Sex worker abolitionists seek resources for navigating this tactical ambivalence in Black radical, decolonial, and queer and feminist traditions...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (95): 191–210.
Published: 01 May 2006
... trajectories of her work. Indeed, Hansberry’s art anticipated much of the Cold War/civil rights scholarship in ways that draw attention to how her plays serve as critical archival sites that historicize the period under consideration. As many of her contemporaries in the black art world, Hansberry used...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2009) 2009 (103): 17–35.
Published: 01 January 2009
... was elastic, drawing on the writings of Marcus Garvey, C. L. R. James, George Padmore, and Frantz Fanon and incorporating cultural con- sciousness, the politics of decolonialization, and calls for an antiracist, anticapital- ist revolution.19 Some adopted classical leftist formations, represented...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 157–176.
Published: 01 May 2020
... of the country, and in 1890, the first Penal Code of the republican period imposed two measures that were extremely important for the Black population: the prohibition of capoeira , which is an African martial art developed in Brazil, and the criminalization of vagrancy, resulting in the arrest of individuals...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2019) 2019 (135): 43–70.
Published: 01 October 2019
... sanctuaryscapes facilitated large and small resistance movements whose goals were political and decolonial. While the outcomes of these movements were diverse, they were not simple cultural revitalization movements that demanded a return to an Indigenous past that was no longer viable. They were future-oriented...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2022) 2022 (144): 45–75.
Published: 01 October 2022
... institution of borders.” Therefore, Afropolitan scholarship requires “recalling the history of itinerancy and mobility” and “talking about mixing, blending and superimposing,” in opposition to fundamentalist notions of “custom” and “autochthony.” It requires attention to “vernacularisation” and decolonial...
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