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cattle

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 54–74.
Published: 01 May 2020
...Gagan Preet Singh Abstract This article explores why victims of cattle theft in colonial north India avoided the police and courts, whose very purpose was to apprehend thieves and to restore stolen property. Throughout colonial rule, victims recovered stolen cattle themselves and with the help...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2010) 2010 (108): 49–72.
Published: 01 October 2010
... appealing to land speculators and commercial cattle operators for its vast grasslands, timber, and rail connections. In the late 1880s a clandestine movement, known as Las Gorras Blancas, responded to the property enclosures and new wage labor relations on the grant with night-riding tactics that included...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1990) 1990 (46-47): 47–57.
Published: 01 May 1990
... their names, those of people who had died long ago. Tell them that the whole nation will rise from the dead if all the living cattle are slaughtered because these have been reared with defiled hands, since there are people about who have been practis­ ing witchcraft. There should...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2011) 2011 (110): 59–82.
Published: 01 May 2011
... But colonizing the Blackfeet through their stomachs was a difficult under- taking, primarily because the Blackfeet refused to give up their old traditions of meat making. As government-­issued beef cattle replaced the reservation’s dwin- dling herds of bison, the Blackfeet continued to make meat in much...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2000) 2000 (76): 223–231.
Published: 01 January 2000
... setting of the nineteenth-century Cape. The focus of this section was on the series of events commonly known as the Xhosa cattle-killing. In the 1850s large numbers of Xhosa-speaking people in the eastern Cape region of southern Africa, following the prophecy of a young woman named Nongqawuse...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2001) 2001 (80): 76–100.
Published: 01 May 2001
... areas by pouring slicks of paraffin into streams and water supplies as a white-settler means of “poisoning” the Zulu in order to take their land and cattle.3 Rumors that malaria was caused by whites, and that quinine caused sterility and abortions, spread rapidly...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2011) 2011 (109): 101–107.
Published: 01 January 2011
... and resource uses and, therefore, as an irrefutable justification for privatization. This mistaken reading in part derives from Hardin’s appeal to the metaphor of cattle, under the private ownership of several individuals concerned with maximizing their individual utility, pastured on a piece of common...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1976) 1976 (11): 1–36.
Published: 01 May 1976
... of the Irish that they were "rude, beastly, ignorant, cruel and unruly Infidels." Thomas in The Pilgrim: A Dialogue on the Life and Actions of Henry VIII (1552) said: the wild Irish, as unreasonable beasts, lived without any knowledge of God or good manners, in common of their goods, cattle...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2000) 2000 (76): 136–168.
Published: 01 January 2000
..., and a democratic system open to their political mobilization in support of their own agenda. THE FORMATION OF A FEMALE WORKING CLASS The location of women in Botswana’s contemporary urban economy reflects the sexual division of labor that existed within northern Tswana agriculture and cattle herding...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2010) 2010 (108): 11–27.
Published: 01 October 2010
... at the base of social and ecological changes that have taken place in North America since the sixteenth-­century conquest.5 The “roast beef of old England” also depended on a cattle trade whose geography connected Scotland and the meat mar- kets of Smithfield in London. But the drovers did not acquire...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2010) 2010 (108): 161–174.
Published: 01 October 2010
... are not gauged by how much money they have, but how they care for their family, their land, their horses, and their cattle as well as their dogs. It is romantic and exciting, as well as heroic and dangerous.”6 His book also bears Frost’s line about fences in large, bold letters. In Stoecklein’s world...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1983) 1983 (27): 49–78.
Published: 01 January 1983
... In order to bolster their sagging fortunes, then, as early as 1530 enterprising vecinos began to produce sugar and cattle on haciendas in the fertile Grijalva river valley A few years later, between 1590 and 1600, their descendants received permission from the Crown to raise horses, mules...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1982) 1982 (26): 37–64.
Published: 01 October 1982
.... . .with ideas of aristocracy-peculiar privileges to the rich, and oppression toward the po0r.”l4 Common right to unenclosed land had even greater significance for livestock raising. Rather than provide pasture, Southerners customarily turned their hogs, cattle, and sheep out in the woods to forage...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (96): 33–57.
Published: 01 October 2006
... inhabitants became small- to middle-sized farmers practicing slash-and-burn agrosubsistence, augmented with herding cattle and mules — and smuggling. Often operating outside the economic, administra- tive, and military reach of the Spanish authorities, these heterogeneous, dispersed...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 1–12.
Published: 01 May 2020
..., an era of colonial power characterized by “judges and policemen.” Examining the 1913 Karnal cattle-lifting case, Singh focuses on how communities maintained the precolonial indigenous khoji system of cattle tracking in British colonial Punjab and studiously avoided the police, much to the British...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2001) 2001 (80): 160–161.
Published: 01 May 2001
... African History at the University of West Georgia. He has published arti- cles on the cattle economy and malaria in Zululand and is currently working on a forthcom- ing textbook on South African history. His future research interests include an examination...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1997) 1997 (67): 35–78.
Published: 01 January 1997
... in 1889 on land that turned, within forty years, into a dust bowl, from which they were forced to flee.30 Similar experiences occurred elsewhere in the West, encouraging the concentration of land ownership and the substitution of cattle for sheep grazing3' POLITICAL...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1990) 1990 (46-47): 454–456.
Published: 01 May 1990
... is professor of history at the University of Transkei. He is author of The House of Phalo (1981), and The Dead Will Arise: Nongqawuse and the Great Xhosa Cattle-Killing Movement of 1856-57 (1989). Bhekizizwe Peterson is a founder-member of the Afrika Cultural Centre and its Centre for Research...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1990) 1990 (48): 65–87.
Published: 01 October 1990
..., the Chinandegan countryside had been dominated by large cattle ranches and sugar plantations: 2 percent of the land- owners owned over 65 percent of the land. The bulk of the rural poor (perhaps lO,O00 laborers) resided on those haciendas where they labored in return for token wages, cheese, milk, soup...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (145): 181–194.
Published: 01 January 2023
... artists, thinkers, and activists invites others to join in this work. The exhibitions, stage work and publications of Gustafsson&Haapoja focus on issues that arise from the anthropocentric worldview of Western traditions. Their first large-scale exhibition, Museum of the History of Cattle...
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