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carceral state

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2012) 2012 (112): 113–125.
Published: 01 January 2012
...Stephen Dillon This article offers a critical genealogy of the neoliberal-carceral state by engaging the writing of Black Liberation Army member Assata Shakur. Shakur's work is read as a black feminist theorization of neoliberalism at the very moment of its emergence. By engaging Shakur's...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 9–29.
Published: 01 January 2024
... activists to use creative expression as a tool of illustrating and exercising care work inside and against the carceral state. This care work challenged the convergence of state abandonment and state violence that helped define the Reagan-Bush and Clinton eras, and it articulated the issue of women and HIV...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2012) 2012 (113): 171–186.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... If they do, we stand to forget that many of the same social forces underlying the United States' carceral turn account too for the gentrification of its urban spaces during the late twentieth century. Eastern State's complicity in both may explain why it still struggles to fulfill its mission to “place...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 34–53.
Published: 01 May 2020
... that sculptors used imprisoned and fugitive figures to craft a discourse about power in the absence of both a strong state and a regime of punitive incarceration. Compelling pictures of prisoners and verbal images of captivity flourished as a kind of carceral imaginary in the public landscape before the carceral...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (146): 11–31.
Published: 01 May 2023
... was not hegemonic within the carceral state formation but existed in tension with abolitionist-oriented responses to social crisis as well as liberal law and order endeavors. 4 Enacted through government fiat rather than legislative processes, the project was developed by a network of internal security...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 165–174.
Published: 01 May 2021
... and communities of color in the United States today. Copyright © 2021 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2021 HIV/AIDS criminalization public health carcerality Histories of HIV/AIDS criminalization, especially in the US context, often traverse geographical and cultural borders...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 186–196.
Published: 01 May 2021
... UP joined forces with other activists to form the PCCPHC in 2001. As a coalition, we devised a grassroots strategy of accountability. There was only one bus to the sprawling carceral complex on State Road: the 84. If you were on that bus, you almost certainly had some business up at the jails...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2023) 2023 (147): 137–157.
Published: 01 October 2023
... of US colonial occupation that continues to this day. What did it mean to pass through these spaces of settler military power in the Pacific, which were crucial in the United States’ imperial war in Southeast Asia? And what are we to make of these layovers, given their enmeshment in the carceral logics...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 49–77.
Published: 01 May 2021
..., “You’ve Come a Long Way—Maybe.” 112. Scholars and activists continue to debate how prison guard or police unions can or should contribute to the labor movement. For example, see Page, “Prison Officer Unions” and Thompson “Downsizing the Carceral State.” 113. McCartin, “Bargaining...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (126): 1–10.
Published: 01 October 2016
..., the growth and subsequent mitigation of racial slavery, the rise of the carceral state, and the emergence of decolonization movements, as well as more contemporary issues, such as the torture and abuse at Abu Ghraib and the recent mass kidnapping of girls in Chibok, Nigeria, reveal the state’s complex...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 130–153.
Published: 01 January 2024
... that punishment from individuals and communities mimics the carceral impulses of the state. They yearn for an abolitionism that views retribution from the people as distinct from violence from the state. If the most publicly visible abolitionist thought tends to treat the utility of violence and the temporality...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (126): 11–29.
Published: 01 October 2016
... targets of the carceral state from the beginning. In much of the voluminous scholarship on the origins of the penitentiary system, the particulars of racial hierarchies, gender roles, and sexual norms are deemed negligible in the quest to understand the expansion of state power. Impor- tant...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (140): 1–8.
Published: 01 May 2021
... on the value of a multivocal narrative of activism, using the concept of an unfinished “conversation” to define the work of ACT UP, and of AIDS history, as ongoing. Jan Huebenthal, Jessica Ordaz, and Laura McTighe make up the forum titled “HIV and the Carceral State,” which examines the ways that carceral...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 2024
... their organizing efforts with the phrase “While we are in prison, we are still free to love.” The failure of the carceral state to extinguish solidarity is also illustrated by Jiménez’s biographical history of her great-aunt Monserrate del Valle, “Titi Monse,” a Puerto Rican nationalist arrested in 1950...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2019) 2019 (135): 138–159.
Published: 01 October 2019
... migration. It is summed up in the slogan, “We are here because you were there.” . . . We need to be careful not to create states of exception: sanctuary for some but not for others, or cages for some but not others. We need a radical challenge to carcerality. Australia is a prison nation...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2021) 2021 (141): 1–6.
Published: 01 October 2021
... movements. Calling on primary sources and interviews, Quinn looks at struggles detailed in prison newspapers, including author politics, how publishers contemplated issues and strategies for dealing with the carceral state, and the relationship between confinement and connected social movements. The history...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 75–95.
Published: 01 May 2020
... hierarchies to mediate disputes and shape communal justice within broader anticolonial efforts. Sulh also fit, if imperfectly, aspects of “insurgent safety” articulated by Meghan G. McDowell, characterized by “locally determined practices and ethics that refuse the logics of the carceral state and instead...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (96): 9–32.
Published: 01 October 2006
... is generally addressed as a prob- lem of the nation, the U.S. prison regime’s sites of confrontation are becoming pro- foundly undomesticated in a twofold sense: the material technologies of carceral racial domination have distended into localities beyond the United States proper (they are extradomestic...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2024) 2024 (148): 107–129.
Published: 01 January 2024
... relied upon strategies of incarceration as their chief tool of ‘justice.’” Importantly, this reliance on policing effects a “drift,” as Bernstein puts it, “from the welfare state to the carceral state as the enforcement apparatus for feminist goals,” trading one model of state care for another. 4 Put...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2006) 2006 (96): 112–136.
Published: 01 October 2006
...: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya In a world-historical context — or even, in its own national-historical context — the United States’ recent establishment of a large-scale network of prison camps in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere — in which thousands of prisoners languish, often...