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Chilean memory sites

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 217–225.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Historians' Organization, Inc. 2016 empathy Chilean memory sites memorialization TEACHING RADICAL HISTORY Teaching the Politics of Encounter Empathic Unsettlement and the Outsider within Spaces of Memory in Chile Katherine Hite For the past several years, I have sought to infuse...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 192–202.
Published: 01 January 2016
... time, be relevant to international audiences. Gentille Alouette offers a masterful balance between local sorrow and global avant-garde. The whole of Castilla's work is a perfect site of memory of cinema at its best. © 2016 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc. 2016 Chilean film...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 90–101.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Macarena Gómez-Barris This essay addresses how indigenous memory haunts the Chilean nation as a past-present index of unaccounted-for discursive and material violence. This extends far beyond the forty-year window of memories about state terror and leftist “dissident” activity, although as many...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 177–191.
Published: 01 January 2016
..., the hall had become a community space for gatherings and teach-­ins. Lined with three hundred velvet seats, the salon has been the site for various solemn events throughout history. In 1957 a three-­day vigil was held there for the body of poet Gabriela Mistral; more than 170,000 Chileans came...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2003) 2003 (85): 272–281.
Published: 01 January 2003
...’ Organization, Inc. 272 25-Klubock.cs 11/19/02 4:06 PM Page 273 Klubock | History and Memory in Neoliberal Chile 273 to the Chilean air force bombarded the presidential palace (La Moneda), leaving this symbol of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2016
...: Chile, 1973 — Memory, Resistance, and Democratization The violent overthrow of Chilean president Salvador Allende Gossens by a US-­ backed military coup on September 11, 1973, marked a watershed in global Cold War politics. It ended one of the world’s only experiments with building socialism...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 153–164.
Published: 01 January 2016
... different way, the efforts of victims and sur- vivors who have fought valiantly for truth, justice, memory, and reparations in the face of impunity. Chile’s twelfth region, in the extreme south, comprises the Strait of Magellan and the Chilean Antarctic. It is made up of four provinces...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 117–128.
Published: 01 January 2016
... oblivion, that is, forgetfulness by design. The Mystery: Memory Struggle before Memory? The mystery deepens if we consider Salvador Allende, particularly his improvised but eloquent last radio address to the nation on September 11, 1973, the day the Chilean air force bombed the presidential palace...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2007) 2007 (97): 143–154.
Published: 01 January 2007
... the one hand, and the Chilean blanket amnesty, on the other. Truth recovery was to be “a restorative alternative to punitive justice” (221). Although this ideal was never ful- filled, the TRC did show “the fundamental clumsiness of criminal law as a means of doing substantive justice, of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2007) 2007 (97): 77–98.
Published: 01 January 2007
...Elizabeth Oglesby MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc. 2007 Educating Citizens in Postwar Guatemala: Historical Memory, Genocide, and the Culture of Peace Elizabeth Oglesby On February 25, 1999, the Guatemalan Commission for Historical Clarifica- tion...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 141–152.
Published: 01 January 2016
... still not fully realized and lacking expiation) that many Chilean citizens so desperately craved and that would have, I think, gone a long way toward advancing the labor of memory in the post- dictatorship period. Siembra vientos: De-­ideologizing the “I” The fragmented, episodic narrative that...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 43–54.
Published: 01 January 2016
... the political and economic legacies of dictatorship, see Peter Winn, ed., Victims of the Chilean Miracle: Workers and Neoliberalism in the Pinochet Era, 1973 – 2002 (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004). 2. Lessie Jo Frazier, Salt in the Sand: Memory, Violence, and the Nation-­State...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 11–41.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Brian Loveman This article describes the authoritarian institutions, political practices, and political culture of Chilean democracy before 1973. Although the military coup infringed constitutional procedures for government succession, the first measures taken by the military junta referenced...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 September 2011) 2011 (111): 79–89.
Published: 01 September 2011
... death and the exile of more than two hundred thousand Chileans. These antihistorical terms evidenced the fusion of nationalism and patriotism under the umbrella of U.S. empire. The towers, and their absence, became the focal point of the nationalistic imaginary about the events. The...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2001) 2001 (79): 123–139.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Salvador Allende and his family.6 While the memory sites are open to the public, without an informed guide it is questionable that the average international tourist, or even Chilean resident, could learn much history from visiting them. As...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2012) 2012 (112): 127–146.
Published: 01 January 2012
... and wide. Thus far, I have theorized this ethos of golpe and world-­shattering terror that was implemented in sites such as Pisagua prison. However, while it was necessarily a slamming jolt that facilitated the “transition” from socialism to neoliberalism in the Chilean laboratory, this could...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2007) 2007 (97): 43–76.
Published: 01 January 2007
... is also, in some respects, particularly Chilean. It includes both impunity and resis- tance to impunity; a quest for truth and justice and a pragmatic resort to amnesties and pardons in the name of social peace and governability. It includes appeals to memory and the punishment of the guilty (ni...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2010) 2010 (106): 109–136.
Published: 01 January 2010
... between politics, inequality, and forms of “social violence.” In the 1960s and 1970s, a burgeoning school of Chilean documen- tary filmmakers, part of a continent-wide New Latin American Cinema movement, intertwined an open political commitment with a concerted challenge to accepted modes of...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2016) 2016 (124): 165–176.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Campaign of 1988 and Pablo Larraín’s Film Paula T. Cronovich Although the “No” campaign of 1988 captured the nation’s attention and sticks in the minds of Chileans who witnessed it, relatively little is known about how exactly the opposition managed to defeat the regime: what factors led up...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1 January 2007) 2007 (97): 1–10.
Published: 01 January 2007
... article on Chile underlines the ways in which, at least in the Chilean case, truth commissions are a new incarnation of a policy that was central to modern nation-state formation during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rather than a major break with the past, the Chilean truth commission...