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Augusto Pinochet

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 141–152.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Michael J. Lazzara Civilian complicity remains one of the least studied aspects of Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship and, to this point, has not been a matter of widespread public debate in Chile. This article examines the case of Mariana Callejas, a literary writer who married the American-born DINA...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 203–216.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of the largest discretionary executive branch releases of records on any country or foreign policy issue. The worldwide attention to Augusto Pinochet's detention in London put an international onus on the United States, whose classified government archives could provide pivotal evidence for Spain's efforts...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 165–176.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Paula T. Cronovich This article sheds light on the process of the unprecedented “No” campaign of 1988 in Chile, whereby Augusto Pinochet was ousted by a simple yes/no referendum, thus ending his more than fifteen years in power. Pablo Larraín's 2012 film No takes this historical event as the basis...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 177–191.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Alicia del Campo The 2011 student movement radically challenged the Chilean political process by exposing the hidden legacy of Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship and demanding a complete restructuring of its neoliberal reforms. The demonstrators contended that these so-called reforms transformed...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2012) 2012 (112): 127–146.
Published: 01 January 2012
... the reigns of Gabriel González Videla (1946–1952), Carlos Ibáñez del Campo (1952–1958) and Augusto Pinochet (1973–1990), Pisagua has served as a site for the detention, tor- ture, and murder of leftists and queer “sexual dissidents” throughout the latter half of the twentieth century.3 Radical...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2001) 2001 (79): 123–139.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., lush rainforests, health spas, fine wines, and European-like cities. Nonetheless, Chile’s association with military rule, and the fame of its ex-dictator, Augusto Pinochet, were considered well enough known to the informed tourist so as to merit oblique references...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 226–228.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Documen- tation Project at the National Security Archive, a research center of declassified documents located at George Washington University in Washington, DC. After the October 1998 arrest of General Augusto Pinochet in London, Kornbluh led a concerted campaign to convince the Clinton...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 192–202.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of Augusto Pinochet’s regime in Chile, Cas- tilla directed a series of shorts for Swedish TV. He later characterized this period as “puñetazos en la mesa, denuncias vociferantes, pero exento de trabajo artístico” (“banging on the table, shouting denunciations, without artistic elaboration4 The mythic...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2016
... through a liberal democratic process, and it ushered in seventeen years of a bloody military dictatorship under General Augusto Pinochet, a regime that became iconic of authoritarian rule and human rights violations throughout Latin America in the 1970s and 1980s. During military rule, and enabled...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2003) 2003 (85): 182–190.
Published: 01 January 2003
... in Washington, DC in 1976), and depended directly on the “president” of the military junta, General Augusto Pinochet. These years produced the greatest number of disappearances. Victims were detained in the DINA’s clan- destine centers, where they were blindfolded...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2003) 2003 (85): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 2003
... unraveling of enforced silence about the post–September 11, 1973 killings in Chile under General Augusto Pinochet and the continued polarization of Chilean society over assigning ultimate guilt. Gerardo Renique and Deborah Poole explain...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 67–76.
Published: 01 January 2016
... society: to end Chile’s centuries-­old hacienda and peonage labor system (inquilinaje), the basis of elite power. During military rule in the 1970s and 1980s, the goals were no less ambitious. Under Augusto Pinochet, things did not “go back to the way they were.” Instead, for the first time...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2007) 2007 (97): 123–133.
Published: 01 January 2007
... the Right,3 fol- lowed shortly by the arrest of Augusto Pinochet in London in 1998 and the piling up of cases against him in Chilean courts. The impact of Pinochet’s arrest cannot be emphasized enough, especially its cathartic effect through which Chilean society rediscovered a language...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2007) 2007 (97): 43–76.
Published: 01 January 2007
... opposition — a self- amnesty that would be emulated by the military junta headed by Augusto Pinochet in 1978. In 1895, only four years after the civil war, members of Balmaceda’s Lib- eral Democratic Party joined a governing coalition. The Liberal Democratic Party became a key element in tipping...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 117–128.
Published: 01 January 2016
... The hold of memory as an evocative code word for truth and justice, and more generally a culture of human rights without which democracy lacked a founda- tion, was evident during Chile’s slow and difficult transition after Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship of 1973 – 90. Consider three markers. In 1990...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2012) 2012 (112): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 2012
... neoliberal order under Augusto Pinochet. Later, as such sites came to be seen as anachronistic within an order that espoused “freedom” as its highest ideal, the prison itself was privatized, turned into a luxury hotel, and heralded as a cultural resource serving the global tourist trade. Finally...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 129–140.
Published: 01 January 2016
..., and likely future of these prosecutions. The misconceptions include the notion that jus- tice for past crimes in Chile began in the London Clinic and ended in the Los Bol- dos crematorium: that is, started with the 1998 arrest, in the United Kingdom, of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet and ended...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 90–101.
Published: 01 January 2016
... about the legacies of former dictator Augusto Pinochet’s state violence. The experiences of the detained-­disappeared and the tortured and the suf- fering of these groups’ relatives showed up in multiple arenas, effectively opening up new public spheres in which to express the effects...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (124): 153–164.
Published: 01 January 2016
... to socialism, the so-­ called Chilean road to socialism. Allende was overthrown by a coup d’état on September 11, 1973; General Augusto Pinochet, commander in chief of the army, led the newly formed military junta. Under Decree Law No. 5, Pinochet declared a “state of siege,” understood...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (138): 39–59.
Published: 01 October 2020
... after the US-sponsored right-wing coup in Chile removed Salvador Allende from power in 1973, the MLN and other participants in the US Latina/o/x Left denounced as fascist Latin American leaders as disparate as Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, Mexican president Luis Echeverría, and Puerto Rican...