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Anglo-Saxon

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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 34–53.
Published: 01 May 2020
... Figure 2. Hogback probably depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (ca. 875–915 CE). Medium-grained yellow sandstone, 112.2 × 24 × 45.7 cm. Conyers Chapel in All Saints, Sockburn, County Durham. Photograph © Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, photographer T. Middlemass. Figure 2. Hogback probably...
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Journal Article
Radical History Review (2020) 2020 (137): 13–33.
Published: 01 May 2020
... of retributive justice often ended up yielding in the face of the more humane sentiments embedded in local interpersonal networks. Copyright © 2020 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 2020 law enforcement public order Anglo-Saxon punishment violence Across the tenth century...
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Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 3. Detail of a cross-shaft depicting a figure bound in interlace (tenth century CE). Sandstone, 144 × 36.5 > 31 × 15 > 14.5 cm. St. Luke’s, Great Clifton, Cumberland. Photograph © Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, photographer T. Middlemass. More
Image
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 4. Detail of a cross-shaft, known as “The Bound Devil Stone” (tenth century CE). Sandstone, 65 × 35 > 32 × 19 > 18 cm. St. John’s, Kirkby Stephen, Westmorland. Photograph © Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, photographer T. Middlemass. More
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Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 5. Fragment of a cross-shaft depicting Weland’s escape (late ninth to early tenth century CE). Coarse-grained sandstone, 27.6 × 22.6 × 17.5 cm. St. Hilda’s, Sherburn, East Yorkshire. Photograph © Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, photographer T. Middlemass. More
Image
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 2. Hogback probably depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (ca. 875–915 CE). Medium-grained yellow sandstone, 112.2 × 24 × 45.7 cm. Conyers Chapel in All Saints, Sockburn, County Durham. Photograph © Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture, photographer T. Middlemass. More
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (125): 97–115.
Published: 01 May 2016
... painted a rich portrait of the Argentine as embodying the best qualities of his race and often exceeding them. Because of his background, Firpo was clearly Latin, but his tem- perament and intelligence could transform him into an honorary AngloSaxon. The first of Firpo’s essays appeared...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1997) 1997 (68): 154–164.
Published: 01 May 1997
... civilization around the globe. At the same time, of course, his origin tale about a new white “American race” deviated somewhat from popular notions of Anglo-Saxon dominance that imperialist politics helped to revive around the turn of the century. Roosevelt’s origin myth, and his personal hysteria...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2016) 2016 (125): 137–158.
Published: 01 May 2016
... William H. Beezley as the “Porfirian persuasion,” critics infused this pub- lic spectacle with meanings that mirrored local anxieties over increasing American influence.2 Many observers designated pugilism as a barbaric practice of the AngloSaxon “race” and its rejection a point of resistance...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1992) 1992 (52): 5–30.
Published: 01 January 1992
... challenged middle-class control of American cities. AngleSaxonism provided one powerful explanation of middle-class men's supremacy by rooting white manhood in racial traits purportedly developed long ago in the forests of Germany.% White Americans believed the Anglo-Saxon race, as Francis Parkman...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1999) 1999 (73): 47–73.
Published: 01 January 1999
... forecast an end to any “escape valves for the poorer people”-presumably referring to men of European descent.18 Additional forces complicated the Anglo-Saxon, propertied, and manly realm of imperial politics at this historical moment. Other men from the U.S. working classes (wage laborers...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2005) 2005 (91): 40–61.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., domineering Anglo-Saxon and supple Asian, masters and servants, lord and serf, Government and labourers, Planters and Coolies. . . . Often has the world seen a similar controversy, the scene shifting with the shifting fortunes of races. —John Edward Jenkins, The Coolie When the war between England...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2005) 2005 (93): 53–78.
Published: 01 October 2005
... in 1924.32 Using economic and literacy tests, as well as country quotas based on the 1890 census, immigration of northwestern Europeans (those of so-called Aryan or Anglo-Saxon stock) was encouraged; southern and eastern European immigration was discouraged...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2009) 2009 (103): 59–81.
Published: 01 January 2009
... their interests aligned with those of French spectators. Parisian fans used their embrace of African American boxers to claim the moral high ground over their Anglo-Saxon contemporaries. They argued that their celebration of black prizefighters illustrated their greater modernity and, by extension...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1994) 1994 (58): 157–159.
Published: 01 January 1994
... and became what was almost certainly the most influential single book of history in the Anglo-Saxon radical ‘60s and ‘70s.And not only among radicals. In the 1980s Thompson was the most widely cited twentieth-century historian in the world, according to the Arts and Humanities Citation Index...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2005) 2005 (91): 62–90.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., long the bases of a defense of Brazilian slavery as comparatively milder than other American slave systems.30 To that mainstay of nineteenth-century abolitionism, Bryce added the tenets of racial “science.” His belief in Anglo-Saxon superiority and his observation of Brazilian “miscegenation” made...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1995) 1995 (62): 244–247.
Published: 01 May 1995
... the newest ”trusts.” This sort of displacement of hostility onto anyone who was not a white Anglo- Saxon Protestant helps to explain the curious fact that the absence of a significant Catholic or Jewish local population did not prevent hostility against both groups from flourishing. One group...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1987) 1987 (37): 27–38.
Published: 01 January 1987
...; that is, a political sphere for men and a private sphere for women. In fact, the majority of women accepted this division of spheres, believing that they could find real power within their domain. I have discussed this at some length with Karen Offen, who argues that Anglo-Saxon feminism is based...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (2009) 2009 (104): 103–125.
Published: 01 May 2009
... This, when added to the uneven political and economic relations mentioned above, reinforced a habit of what Terry Eagleton calls “centuries of seeing the Irish as colonial inferiors” in postwar Brit- ain.23 Ingrained notions of racial superiority based on assumed differences between Anglo-Saxons...
Journal Article
Radical History Review (1996) 1996 (64): 95–99.
Published: 01 January 1996
... and the imperialist and domestic objectives of America’s Anglo-Saxon elite and industrial capitalists, a bit more attention to who organized the fair and to the governments, corporations, and myriad other organizations that contributed exhibits, along with an overview of the layout of the fairground, would...