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Author notes

Simon Schaffer is professor of history of science at the University of Cambridge. He coedited The Mindful Hand: Inquiry and Invention from the Late Renaissance to Early Industrialisation (2007) and The Brokered World: Go-Betweens and Global Intelligence, 1770–1820 (2009). His most recent publication is La fabrique des sciences modernes (2014). He is a member of the advisory board of the Science Museum, London, and Caird medalist of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

David Serlin is associate professor of communication and science studies at the University of California, San Diego. His books include Replaceable You: Engineering the Body in Postwar America (2004); Imagining Illness: Public Health and Visual Culture (2010); and Window Shopping with Helen Keller: Architecture and Disability in Modern Culture (forthcoming). He is a member of the editorial collective for the Radical History Review and a founding co-editor of the online journal Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience (catalystjournal.org).

Jennifer Tucker is associate professor of history and science in society at Wesleyan University and a member of the editorial collective for Radical History Review. She is author of Nature Exposed: Photography as Eyewitness in Victorian Science (2006); editor of the “Image, Technology, and History” feature of History and Technology; and recipient of a 2016 National Endowment for the Humanities Public Scholar award. She has published numerous articles and essays on topics related to the history of technology, law, and culture, including the role of visual exhibits in Victorian courtroom debates, facial recognition systems, and environmental and industrial law.

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