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Image
Published: 01 June 2018
Fig. 1. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube . Installation view at Witte de With, Rotterdam, September 2015–January 2016. Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures New York, Altman Siegel San Francisco Fig. 1. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube. Installation view at More
Image
Published: 01 June 2018
Fig. 2. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube . Installation view at Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt am Main, June–August 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures New York Fig. 2. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube. Installation view at Frankfurter More
Image
Published: 01 June 2018
Fig. 3. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube . Installation view at the Edith-Russ-Haus, Oldenburg, October 2015–January 2016. Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures New York, Altman Siegel San Francisco Fig. 3. Trevor Paglen and Jacob Appelbaum, Autonomy Cube. Installation view at More
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2017) 26 (2): 423–490.
Published: 01 December 2017
... experience of interwar independence into a paradigmatic model of the postcolonial and postsocialist state, Belarus had to produce its narratives of political independence from scratch. This essay looks closely at the so-called National Rebirth, a vibrant intellectual attempt to elaborate an anticolonial view...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2017) 26 (1): 155–170.
Published: 01 June 2017
... Reich using the concept of stasis to unpack the social, historical, political, and visual tensions that structure these images’ depiction of their black German subjects. Viewing these images as complex depictions of stasis (defined not as the cessation of movement but as motion held in suspension and a...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2014) 22 (2): 69–99.
Published: 01 December 2014
... with a single canvas, we already register the time of viewing. When we approach the surface, the image decomposes into tiny blots of con- trasting hues; when we back away, the image recomposes. As Harry Berger said about Renaissance Venetian painting, Monet’s Rouen series...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2011) 20 (1): 117–135.
Published: 01 June 2011
... result of individual fail- ings. As morality is stripped of its social registers, it appears in the privatized discourse of family values and individual responsibility. The most vulnerable are now blamed for not sacrifi cing enough or are viewed with disdain because they argue...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2003) 14 (1): 49–72.
Published: 01 June 2003
... pressures, permitting free play with materials and symbols, along with the standardized breaking of convention and taboo. Plainly, contemporary art does not only try to assure by these means an aesthetic view of its productions. Indeed, the "aesthetic" as a category and...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2014) 22 (2): 185–186.
Published: 01 December 2014
... Superiore. His books, including Communitas, Immu- nitas, Bios, Terza persona, Pensiero vivente, and Due, are all pub- lished by Einaudi and have been translated into several languages. claire fontaine is a Paris-based collective artist, founded in 2004. Her solo exhibition, titled Tears, is on view...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2019) 28 (1): 167–179.
Published: 01 June 2019
... the dynamic of love, but I view it as a more historical concept. Recognition follows very different emotional logics in an aristocratic honor society or in a democratic one, but I believe that it is one of the crucial dimensions of social life, like inequality or status. er : Honneth’s social...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2011) 19 (2): 299–308.
Published: 01 December 2011
... the consequences of human actions are damaging the planet’s life sup- port systems.”1 By refl ecting on key historical, aesthetic, and ethi- cal concerns, ecocriticism provides crucial insights into the concep- tualization of nature and the political implications of these views. Addressing...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2010) 19 (1): 107–151.
Published: 01 June 2010
... “trees,” “ladders,” and “lines,” to describe the living creativity of time. In Bergson’s view, such schemas were holdovers from an ef- fectively static and hierarchical conception of nature that missed the vital ingenuity Bergson saw in Darwin’s theory of descent. For this reason, he tended to...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2013) 22 (1): 81–93.
Published: 01 June 2013
... theory, human rights had largely disappeared from view. Even John Rawls’s monumental work A Theory of Justice (1971) did not lead to a revival of this concept. Throughout the 1970s, Ron- ald Dworkin’s contributions remained nearly alone in urging all “to take rights seriously.”1 This has changed...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2016) 24 (2): 15–43.
Published: 01 December 2016
... they can’t be overgeneralized either: there are plenty of unusual shots, including a 360, point- of- view shots render- ing in “free indirect” a perspective that could have been occupied by Nagayama, and disestablishing shots in which places are visible only as they recede from...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2013) 22 (1): 63–80.
Published: 01 June 2013
... also focus on what might be seen as different views of “utopia” as they existed at the time. Here I am concerned with what was happening in the Third World as human rights emerged. Moyn argues that historians have adopted a church history, a te- leological approach that fails to understand...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2010) 19 (1): 181–192.
Published: 01 June 2010
... situates the painter “on the historical threshold of late nineteenth-century aesthetics and subsequent Boasian anthropol- ogy” so as to complicate our view of the representation of differ- ence in his work (TE, 37). Or to confuse it—in 1917, the year after Eakins’s death, Al...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2010) 19 (1): 193–203.
Published: 01 June 2010
... contingent diversity of the various shapes of things” (MC, 162–63). The true cannot be understood without the beautiful, just as the objects in the landscape cannot be noticed without the mist. Directly opposing his view to Žižek’s, Milbank argues that it is “more radical and Christian” to say “that...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 December 2003) 13 (2): 137–142.
Published: 01 December 2003
... nose to look out at the lake, let alone to catch sight of the impromptu theatrics being staged behind him. As hardly needs saying, the photographer's im- position has been anticipated and directed by the faceless figure at left who thrusts a cheap metallic frame into view in order to focus...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2003) 14 (1): 73–97.
Published: 01 June 2003
... Fredric Jameson's dictum that "thinking anything adequate about commercial television may well involve ignoring it and thinking about something else."4 This view seems to suggest that one would learn the most from corporate television by investing one's attention elsewhere and remaining silent...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (1 June 2008) 17 (1): 125–145.
Published: 01 June 2008
...- ity of trajectory. Senghor’s insistence on the “moving and living reality” that exceeds Aristotelian categories expresses his appur- tenance to the school of Christian thought that took this view: that of Father Teilhard de Chardin, whose “God of evolution” is in perfect resonance with...