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Journal Article
Qui Parle (2001) 12 (2): 107–142.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Benjamin Friedlander Copyright © 2001 Qui Parle 2001 A SHORT HISTORY OF LANGUAGE POETRY / ACCORDING TO "HECUBA WHIMSY" Benjamin Friedlander The following study, abridged from a much longer work, is an ex- periment in criticism: a strict rewriting of Jean Wahl's A Short His- tory...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2019) 28 (1): 77–102.
Published: 01 June 2019
...Jan Mieszkowski Abstract Tracing a trajectory of literary and philosophical texts from the ancient atomists to the late twentieth century, this essay explores the surprisingly consistent role that dust has played in the conceptualization of language. In Lucretius, Sophocles, and the New Testament...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2017) 26 (2): 271–280.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Marianne Constable The use of the saying “Actions speak louder than words” renders problematic both political and legal judgments. With its often excruciating attention to language, law in particular insists on maintaining relations between speech and reality or between words and the truths...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2017) 26 (2): 281–293.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Michael Lucey This article uses the writings of Erving Goffman, M. M. Bakhtin, and Edward Sapir to pose some questions about what is happening when spoken language is produced. In particular, it looks at certain complexities of the partial roles of “animator,” “author,” and “principal,” into which...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2021) 30 (1): 19–49.
Published: 01 June 2021
...Aaron Frederick Eldridge Abstract How does tradition, a transmission of body and language, disclose a form of life? This article takes as its point of departure Talal Asad’s methodological pivot away from the modern concept of “belief” to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s concept of “form of life...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2004) 15 (1): 97–114.
Published: 01 June 2004
... his attention notably includes Holderlin and Heine, Adorno retains his most passionate exegeses of poetic language for the conserva- tive, restorative poets: George is defended against his circle; Eich- endorff against the tradition; and Borchardt against the student movement. Particularly...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2014) 23 (1): 213–238.
Published: 01 June 2014
...Anne Sauvagnargues Copyright © 2014 Qui Parle 2014 Cartographies of Style Asignifying, Intensive, Impersonal anne sauvagnargues Translated by Suzanne Verderber Style sweeps away, infi ltrates, and overturns the signifying compo- nents of language, producing new percepts...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2004) 14 (2): 57–104.
Published: 01 December 2004
... expression. For this reason, the problem of individual consciousness as the inner word (as an inner sign in general) becomes one of the most vital problems in the philosophy of language. —V. N. Vologinov3 Qui...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2006) 16 (1): 71–94.
Published: 01 June 2006
... respond to their translation, which in turn would have to be translated back to Spanish, and so on endlessly. The concept of elsewheres seeks to convey a radical alterity between languages, in this case between what is usually referred to as Standard European Languages and Mesoamerican...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2004) 14 (2): 105–116.
Published: 01 December 2004
... by speech and not just in speech? Is there, in other words, a "voice" of language that says things, whether or not we speakers say them? In her book Words of Selves: Identification, Solidarity, Irony (2000), Denise Riley examines the manifold, unaccountable ways in which things get said and get...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2012) 21 (1): 71–83.
Published: 01 June 2012
... perception is so strongly privileged that, in modern as in ancient languages, the terms corresponding to the English voice (Latin: vox, Greek: pho¯ne¯) tend to denote a large spectrum of sound phenomena with either animate or inanimate sources. This means that voice is not primarily...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2013) 21 (2): 27–59.
Published: 01 December 2013
...). In short, the riveting character of literature lies in its close rela- tion to a child’s fi rst language- learning efforts, to early encounters with printed matter, and to writing’s own childhood phase when, in schoolroom manuals and picture books, it is still linked to im- ages...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2000) 12 (1): 55–76.
Published: 01 June 2000
... of the origins of language and culture. Perhaps, one might in- terpret Blumenberg as saying, the long tradition of speculation on Qui Parle Vol. 12, No. 1 Spring/Summer 2000 56 SAMUEL MOYN origins in the West, so rich in the classical period as well as again in the seventeenth...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2011) 20 (1): 169–178.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... If we take (inter)disciplines at their lingual level, we are not even sure of what we say, what we say we said, what Dubreuil: A Viral Lexicon for Future Crises 171 you think I wrote, what we believed you thought I told them. There is defi nitively no “language...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2009) 18 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 June 2009
... the suspension of our ontological com- mitments,” for with it “we must refer to what does not yet exist” as well as to what no longer exists (PL, 4). Between these two vec- tors—that which is no more, and that which is not yet—conversion relates language to religion and religion to language...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2017) 26 (2): 249–269.
Published: 01 December 2017
... allows me to pummel at a stubborn knot in life. In his work on cryptonymy, Laurence Rickels has claimed that background music rings a death knell. That may be so. I’m always hitching a ride on the death drive—the flex of my drivenness—a sure fire way to language. Doing without the rhythmic support...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2004) 14 (2): 145–175.
Published: 01 December 2004
... with Adorno's language, if noth- ing else because of the presumption of an uncontested link between voice and subject. Adorno's quick answer to this risk insti- tutes a shift in, conception and marks his own point of departure in the argument: The universality [Allgemeinheit] of the lyric's sub...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2012) 20 (2): 183–188.
Published: 01 December 2012
...-expression in a world where the same language used to express beauty could be contorted to meet the needs of the state. For Prigov, as for many of his generation, the bridge between meaning and language was collapsing, leaving the speaker to look out over a precipice: “I see...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2001) 12 (2): 1–14.
Published: 01 December 2001
... we identify what is new unless it is at the same THE POETICS OF NEW MEANING 3 time interpretable within already existing codes and conventions, either of language or culture? Something so new that it escapes ex- isting frameworks of language or culture...
Journal Article
Qui Parle (2016) 25 (1-2): 233–242.
Published: 01 December 2016
... correction to such claims reveals a certain idealism of Culler’s own as to the transhistorical nature of the lyric tradition, its argument remains always rooted in the identifi cation of the concrete qualities of lyric structures and language that might justify this vision. Herein...