What would it mean to understand the Islamic revolution as more than a given, enclosed sequence of events? What might happen if we consider these events as continuous precipitations, within the boundaries of the nation-state, but also for the greater region, and in the world itself? Such a thought-image would be reminiscent of a Borgesian past in which fragments are never entirely lost; traces are not effaced but continue to mark the present. In his erudite analysis of Iran’s revolution as well as a much-needed exploration of Michel Foucault’s position of critical reticence, Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi guides us to consider these questions by resurfacing the embryonic possibilities that inhered in the revolutionary moment of 1979, beyond the myth of the “stolen revolution.” Foucault in Iran begins with a discussion of Foucault’s indictment from both French intellectuals and scholars of Iran who followed and...

You do not currently have access to this content.