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worship

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Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2012) 24 (3 68): 577–599.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Erica Robles-Anderson Within the past half century a style of worship known as “megachurch” has radically transformed the religious landscape. Characterized by spectacular largesse, megachurches reimagine the material culture of Christianity by blending audio, visual, and communications...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 195–198.
Published: 01 January 1993
... are justified in linking stardom in India to divinity (and to reciprocity in worship- puja) then we can take one more step and notice that the heart of worship in Hindu India is darsan- the mutually benificent gaze of worshipper and divinity, the visual force...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2004) 16 (2): vii–viii.
Published: 01 May 2004
... global cul- tures of governmentality. The very term genuflect—literally, to bend the knee— carries a particular history of worship. After all, the knee bent, as well as the hat doffed, was one of the key corporeal sites in which struggles over the disciplinary power of the Roman Catholic Church were...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2000) 12 (2): 344–350.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Irene Stengs; Hylton White; Caitrin Lynch; Jeffrey A. Zimmermann 2000 Irene Stengs is a graduate student in anthropology at the University of Amsterdam, working on a dissertation entitled “Worshipping the Great Modernizer: King Chulalongkorn, Patron Saint of the Thai Middle Class...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2000) 12 (2): 477–498.
Published: 01 May 2000
... duty would on occasion worship at the shrine, but not many others. When construction of the nuclear power plant began in the 1970s, the land around the plant was to be shored up, causing the shrine to be buried. Popular sentiment and eerie...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2003) 15 (2): vii.
Published: 01 May 2003
..., and its ramiŽcations. It is our hope that the discursive cacophony that results will speak as powerfully to the force and fate of this event and situate it, without ignoring or worshiping it. —Elizabeth A. Povinelli...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2010) 22 (2): v–x.
Published: 01 May 2010
... and was intimately linked to the growth of the kingdom of both the Madurai Pandya and Nayaka kings. Her 1976 PhD dissertation is a subtle study of the dialectics of worship and endow- ments in South India during the period 1833–1925.4...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1991) 3 (2): 155–158.
Published: 01 May 1991
... is because the official tolerance of all reli- gions in America renders none of them true. In order to protect the power of our civil religion, flag worship is forbidden to speak its name. Visually focused and dependably repetitive, television is certainly its ideal medium. Since the war’s...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1997) 10 (1): 83–113.
Published: 01 January 1997
... puja (worship) or a seasonal fair. But these would not be designated spaces, and they lacked the typical historical marks of modern administration of space. No formalised authority like a municipal government existed that could have the...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2012) 24 (3 68): v–viii.
Published: 01 September 2012
... conditions. She is currently completing a book about the twentieth-­century transfor- mation of Protestant worship space into a highly mediated, spec- tacular “megachurch.” She trained as both an experimental psy- chologist and cultural historian and holds a PhD in communication from Stanford...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1990) 2 (2): 121–128.
Published: 01 May 1990
... completely emasculated the heroes and there are none left, the heroine sheds her docility. She takes on the characteristics of the goddess-as-destroyer. Kali and Durga are the two goddesses who are worshipped in India for their strength. In fact, Kali, who is the more fearsome of the two, has been...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2008) 20 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2008
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1997) 10 (1): 201–210.
Published: 01 January 1997
..., though even-handed. In one room, a succession of video clips depicts worshipers of almost utopian equanimity—“Other creeds have gods, and I’m quite sure theirs are just as true for them as mine for me”; similarly, “There are many paths to God...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 100–105.
Published: 01 January 1989
..., inspired by Satan. In the episode on Mahound the Messenger, the ambiguity of the revelation is shown (and as a real trickster Rushdie makes use of authentic Islamic tradition to do so). Mahound lives in a town in which three goddesses are worshipped (among them Al-Lat), while he propagates one male...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1990) 2 (2): 25–32.
Published: 01 May 1990
...Nicholas B. Dirks Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 References Appadurai , Arjun 1981 . Worship and Conflict under Colonial Rule: A South Indian Cave . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Walter , Benjamin 1968 . “Theses on the Philosophy of History...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1995) 8 (1): 11–39.
Published: 01 January 1995
... other religious institution, or in any procession of a Hindu deity, idol or object of worship Equally important was the Madras Temple Entry Authorization Act of 1947, which made it a punishable offence to prevent any person on the ground of untouchability from entering or worshipping in a...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 1995) 7 (3): 631–654.
Published: 01 September 1995
... where the God Rama was born on earth. At the same site Muslims had been worshipping at the Babri Masjid, a mosque widely believed to have been built during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Babur (1526-1530). The Ramayana, one of the two preeminent epics of Hindu tradition, tells of...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 1993) 5 (3): 629–638.
Published: 01 September 1993
... Baba, who is still living. Once I show the lives and works of these real people, where they lived and how they were worshipped, the credibility is established, and I will then work upward and trace their lineage to the mystics of the past. I want to go as far back as 16th century and even...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 1999) 11 (3): 475–498.
Published: 01 September 1999
... dispersion into a multiplicity of forms. The third implication is violence. In fact, the belief in a single god distinct from the world is possible only if it is accompanied by the suppression of all other forms of worship. The practice of monotheism is there...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2014) 26 (3 (74)): 419–448.
Published: 01 September 2014
... deemed practices such as the Russian tradition of icon veneration to be a form of premodern fetishism and attempted to eradicate such worship by introducing a strictly materialist understanding of the world, in which objects could not have supernatural powers that defy scientific understanding. To make...