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Journal Article
Public Culture (2006) 18 (1): 185–208.
Published: 01 January 2006
...Thomas Blom Hansen © 2006 by Duke University Press 2006 Desai, Ashwin. 1996 . Arise ye coolies: Apartheid and the Indian, 1960–1995 . Johannesburg: Impact Africa. Dugard, Jackie. 2001 . Drive on? Taxi wars in South Africa. In Crime wave: The South African underworld and its foes...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2010) 22 (3): 465–485.
Published: 01 September 2010
... endeavor to uncover and recognize them. Taxis In this practice of recognizing dangerousness, not only “strangers” but also “taxis” figure prominently. Taxis and taxi drivers, as urban characters, often enter...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2015) 27 (2 (76)): 281–304.
Published: 01 May 2015
... in material benefits for select groups. From investments in exclusive off-grid suburban developments in Accra to taxi operators delaying the extension of the BRT system in Johannesburg, uncertainty produces opportunities for generating profit. Just as investment instruments like derivatives make it possible...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Public Culture (1989) 2 (1): i–iv.
Published: 01 January 1989
... Copyright © 1989-90 by Duke University Press 1989 References Kureishi , Hanif , “Bradford,” Granta 20 , Winter 1986 : 147 -170. Editors' Comment On Moving Targets When I got to Bradford I took a taxi. It was simple: Bradford is full of taxis. Raise an arm...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2020) 32 (2 (91)): 327–348.
Published: 01 May 2020
... to be implicated in narco-related violence produced among many people I met what Sigmund Freud would call a distinctly uncanny experience. One such person was Miguel, a twenty-six-year-old taxi driver I met in Los Angeles in 2012 at a series of protests against drug war violence in Mexico. He was from...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2004) 16 (3): 453–477.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of household income. Receiving it at the end of each month revives Dalene’s vague desires to travel within the city; it also means she can afford a taxi and hospital consultation 3. The Department of Health in the municipality of Johannesburg provides the following statistics on its Web site...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2004) 16 (3): 499–506.
Published: 01 September 2004
... into a taxi to “town” in the evening, they were labeled. This is no longer the case. Young people are less political and more excited about life and about the world in general. People are keen to make it for themselves. At the same time, the number of funerals has increased. “Com- munity” is still built...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2000) 12 (2): 575–576.
Published: 01 May 2000
..., mopeds, trucks, city buses, taxis, and cars rapides: Dakar is the nexus of a bustling traffic in images in which graffiti, murals, advertisements, T-shirts, and the like converge. Operators of cars for hire contribute to this visual economy in striking ways. The cars rapides—the ubiquitous...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (3): 339–370.
Published: 01 September 2005
.... For the political reporter, routine gifts of soft drinks or taxi fares may seem quite trivial compared to the magnitude of the corruption scandals they work so diligently to expose—schemes at the very highest levels of 341 Public Culture...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2007) 19 (2): 227–232.
Published: 01 May 2007
... into the terraced fields and olive groves, far from the soldiers; we leap over barbed-wire fences, stumble over stone hedges. From time to time Palestinian taxis from Bil’in arrive on the main road to collect us, but each time we run forward to get...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1995) 7 (2): 323–352.
Published: 01 May 1995
... rights of way, which of course, lead to accidents. The road is a disputed space, where private cars, taxis, public transportation, truck drivers, military jeeps, police cars, mopeds, bicycles, rickshaws, pedestrians, cattle, sheep, goats and fowl intermingle and confront one another. Sudden...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (1): 55–74.
Published: 01 January 2005
... on the ground in the hotel parking lot, every weekday afternoon offers a surreal parade. A troupe of prettily uniformed young women marches across the pavement past the lounging Kamajors and out the front gate to the taxis on Jomo Kenyatta Avenue...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2004) 16 (3): 521–531.
Published: 01 September 2004
..., the Freedom Charter. This event took place in Kliptown, on the outskirts of Soweto (fig. 1, above), at a site that came to be called Freedom Square in honor of the occasion. Today Freedom Square is an open, windswept tract of land, lying between a shack settlement, a railway line, and a taxi rank...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2006) 18 (1): 209–246.
Published: 01 January 2006
... and uncertainty. Consider this story, told to us in June 2000 by an African woman in her midseventies: Taxis have become dangerous here in Mafikeng. My daughter had a ter- rifying experience in November: she hailed a taxi traveling to town. When it reached the main road, she was the only passenger...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (3): vii.
Published: 01 September 2005
..., the “new normal,” and destabilizing discourses of rights; George Steinmetz and Julia Hell on Germany’s visual archive of colonialism; Thomas Blom Hansen on music, taxis, and racial imaginaion in urban South Africa; and more . . . Public Culture...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2016) 28 (3 (80)): 593–616.
Published: 01 September 2016
... involving taxi drivers or other employees of commonly extorted companies. “I only call up the big ones,” he said. “Hotels, taxi companies, that kind of thing.” After finding the company phone number, he would call in the threat. The investigator who finally caught La Nica couldn’t hide his amusement...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Public Culture (1988) 1 (1): 58–61.
Published: 01 January 1988
... to look for that city. It was only now that I could begin to acknowledge the humiliation that the taxi driver had caused me when he had cheated me; the humiliation I had felt at not being able to tip the Negro in the hotel. I remembered the name of the hotel: the Wellington. I remembered its...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2001) 13 (1): 23–38.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., I wouldn’t have much of a problem. I could easily find someone in a taxi, in a sweatshop below Canal Street, on the subway, in a 24-hour deli, at my neighbor’s apartment, or at Columbia University. But what language...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1994) 6 (3): 465–478.
Published: 01 September 1994
... and Japan’s “Yellow Cabs” Karen Kelsky The “Yellow Cabs” of Japan In Japan yellow cabs are not taxis. They are a media phenomenon. For the past two years I have been researching this phenomenon. The term “yellow cabs” refers to the small but highly publicized...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2010) 22 (3): 405–410.
Published: 01 September 2010
...- ship. The action is perverse, certainly, but political nonetheless. Fear is experi- enced and articulated in different ways by neighbors afraid of being robbed of the little they have by the “strangers,” by those in the “white taxis.” Here fear func...