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Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 118–122.
Published: 01 January 1989
...Charles Taylor Copyright © 1989-90 by Duke University Press 1989 The Rushdie Controversy Charles Taylor Department of Philosophy and Political Science McGill University For me, as a Canadian, it goes without saying that there should be full freedom of publication. We have to...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 106–117.
Published: 01 January 1989
...Feroza Jussawalla Copyright © 1989-90 by Duke University Press 1989 References “Anti-Islam's New Find: ‘Simon Rushton’ a.k.a. Salman Rushdie,” Impact International 18 : 20 ( 1988 ): 15 -17. Bhabha , Homi . “Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of Colonial Discourse,” In...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 123–127.
Published: 01 January 1989
... vindication of 'public culture' against its enemies, but you propose, if I understand you, a discursive (-mandarin?) response, the forming of a new academic field designed to privilege 'tolerance of in- tolerance' on the grounds that the defense of Rushdie is a parochial West- ernist conceit. Or do I...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 100–105.
Published: 01 January 1989
... Politics of Religious and Literary Inspiration Peter van der Veer Department of Anthropology University of Utrecht The publication of Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses is clearly a major political-literary event. In India, it was banned by the Finance Minis- ter; in Iran, the Guide of...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1989) 1 (2): i–v.
Published: 01 May 1989
... crowded cinema hall. In October 1988, Salman Rushdie made a 'private' letter of protest to India's Prime Minister, Rajiv Gandhi, available for publication in newspapers like The New York Times. Without addressing the violence of communal (Hindu-Muslim) riots in recent years in India, around what...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 79–99.
Published: 01 January 1989
... exaltation, the mind" (S 135-136). This self-defi- nition of the migrant as metropolitan is obviously not the book's preferred defmi tion. Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses (New York Viking, 1989). Page references have been included in the text, after the initial letter S. 2 Peter...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1989) 1 (2): 76–79.
Published: 01 May 1989
... offensive are my books, since they have my ideas and they are everywhere. Gabriel Garcia Marquez' In the great international furor over Salman Rushdie during the last few weeks, those who have spoken out in public have helped to...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 41–54.
Published: 01 January 1993
... (especially postcolonial intellectuals such as Edward Said Public Culture and Salman Rushdie, but also a host of others) in particular have, not to put too fine a point on it, betrayed Marxism and the goals of socialism. I wish to focus my comments on the...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 97–131.
Published: 01 January 1993
... center of the book is a reading of Salman Rushdie’s Shame- by its position, one surmises, a set-piece demonstration of the advantages secured by a strictly Marxist hermeneutic. On page 127, Ahmad promises to read the novel by a set of questions that could not materialize within the category...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 133–142.
Published: 01 January 1993
...Andrew Parker Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press 1993 Politics In Theory Andrew Parker Though most reviewers have focused to date on its acidic appraisals of Fredric Jameson, Edward Said, and Salman Rushdie, what interests...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): i–iv.
Published: 01 January 1989
.... Hanif Kureishi's brilliantly prescient essay in Granta 20 on the cultural politics of Bradford in 1986 captures the sense of a diasporic cauldron waiting for its brutal rendezvous with textuality, a rendezvous uncannily arranged by Salman Rushdie. Salman Rushdie and The Satanic Verses were...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 77–82.
Published: 01 January 1993
...: Literature and Social Consciousness in Colonial India . Delhi: Oxford University Press. Grewal , Inderpal . 1988 . “Salman Rushdie, Marginality, Women and Shame.” Genders 3 : 24 -42. Lelyveld , David . 1993 . “Colonial Knowledge and the Fate of Hindustani.” In Carol A. Breckenridge and...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): vii–xi.
Published: 01 January 1993
... of Ahmad‘s critique. Ahmad’s polemical reading of Jameson, Salman Rushdie and especially Edward Said has distracted some readers from what we take to be the overarching argument of In Theory, which is laid out in the first...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1993) 6 (1): 83–95.
Published: 01 January 1993
... discussion of another issue he claims most postcolonial criticism neglects: representations of women and gender. The chapter on Salman Rushdie’s Shame advertises its project as an attempt to 6. See, e.g., Williams’s (1989) widely anthologized essay, “Base and Superstructure in Marxist Cultural...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 73–78.
Published: 01 January 1989
... desirable in the metropolitan cities. But the diaspora also counts among its members some of the finest writers: to my mind there are no finer writers writing in the English language today than V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie and A. K. Ramanujan. In its own way the literary culture of the diaspora is...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1997) 10 (1): 169–189.
Published: 01 January 1997
... the end of the 1980s, Salman Rushdie relates IIa story in which the Archangel Gibreel conveys a mischievously mistrans- lated revelation to Mahound (Muhammad), a “businessman turned prophet” who believes only in Allah. A monotheist in a city with 360 gods and goddesses, Mahound has never been...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 2011) 23 (1): 217–231.
Published: 01 January 2011
... the term literature in its most banal, even slightly derogatory acceptation (the body of works written) — ­and that he explains that his use of French is equivalent to Salman Rushdie’s use of “English literature” to describe all “literature written in English.” When Rushdie makes that argument...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1989) 1 (2): 103–106.
Published: 01 May 1989
..., Inderpal, "Salman Rushdie: Marginality, Women and Shame," Genders, 3, Fall 1988: 2442. Haggard, Stephan. "Mass Media and the Visual Arts in Twentieth-century South Asia: Indian Film Posters 1947-Presen~"South Asia Reseach 8, 1, May 1988: 71-88. Hartmann, Paul. The Mass Media and Village...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1989) 1 (2): 91–92.
Published: 01 May 1989
... Middle Eastern societies. While Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses is being translated into a variety of languages, thereby making it available around the world, the future reception in the Western world of Mahfouz's works (and of Arabic literature in general) seems unclear. Will this year's Nobel...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2003) 15 (3): 385–398.
Published: 01 September 2003
... opposed to merely physically) from one cultural space to another only in a state of translation. Take, for instance, Salman Rushdie’s novel The Satanic Verses and the surrounding controversy—something all too familiar to the read- ers of...