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mahound

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Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 100–105.
Published: 01 January 1989
..., inspired by Satan. In the episode on Mahound the Messenger, the ambiguity of the revelation is shown (and as a real trickster Rushdie makes use of authentic Islamic tradition to do so). Mahound lives in a town in which three goddesses are worshipped (among them Al-Lat), while he propagates one male...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 106–117.
Published: 01 January 1989
... with Mahound or Mohammed who is portrayed as a degenerate. Again Rushdie hopes that his Joycean wordplay will obscure the implied references. But Gibreel Farishta calls Salahuddin Spoono, the English equivalent of chumcha, which in Bombay street slang can be understood as groupie, camp...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 118–122.
Published: 01 January 1989
... remarks about Abraham abandoning Hagar at the beginning of the 'Mahound' section: "From the beginning men used God to justify the unjustifiable" (95); an example of religion as purveyor of false submissions. The whole incident of 'The Parting of the Arabian Sea' illustrates religion as the source...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1997) 10 (1): 169–189.
Published: 01 January 1997
... the end of the 1980s, Salman Rushdie relates IIa story in which the Archangel Gibreel conveys a mischievously mistrans- lated revelation to Mahound (Muhammad), a “businessman turned prophet” who believes only in Allah. A monotheist in a city with 360 gods and goddesses, Mahound has never been...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 1989) 2 (1): 79–99.
Published: 01 January 1989
... Arabian Sea, perpetually emigrant toward Mecca. Within this turned-away-ness, Rushdie plants the migrant's other desire, the search for roots as far down as they'll go. The name of this radical rootedness is, most often, religion. Thus in the section called Mahound, Rushdie re- opens the...