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infectious disease

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Journal Article
Public Culture (2015) 27 (2 (76)): 361–386.
Published: 01 May 2015
... infectious diseases ( Lakoff 2007 ), viruses are cast as a common threat to humanity ( WHO 2005 ). Yet the idea of a unitary viral other is complicated by their molecular variability and numerous biological purposes ( Cohen 2011 ). In addition to causing disease, viruses carry genes that not only spur...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2012) 24 (3 68): 457–464.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., with public funding and little oversight. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAIAD) (the branch of NIH directly responsible for influenza research), said in response to the question of why...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2016) 28 (2 (79)): 415–441.
Published: 01 May 2016
... of vulnerability surrounding issues like emerging infectious diseases, climate change, or terrorism ( Aradau 2010; Grove 2014; Fearnley 2008) . Climate change vulnerabilities, like other hard-to-anticipate emergent threats, can be viewed as a constitutive process of urbanization to the extent that they bear...
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Journal Article
Public Culture (2018) 30 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 May 2018
... biomedical narrative deterritorialization epidemiology infectious disease tuberculosis Tuberculosis disease seems almost engineered to capitalize on the gaps and shortfalls in public health systems. The microorganism can lay dormant in the body for years, may take a long time before it manifests...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2016) 28 (3 (80)): 475–497.
Published: 01 September 2016
... end to illness, might instead be figured as an ending lacking finality. Like promises, cures for tuberculosis can be broken. Thinking at the limits of cure makes possible a reflection on the persistence of “curable diseases” into the present, as well as on the ways in which therapeutic knowledge comes...
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Journal Article
Public Culture (1995) 7 (2): 465–472.
Published: 01 May 1995
.... It is a book of theory and parody, bitching and carping, memory and critique. Both books are about peculiar intersections. Writing of waking from a dream to find himself in the Infectious Diseases Ward of the Royal Brisbane Hospital, Michaels muses...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2021) 33 (2 (94)): 137–147.
Published: 01 May 2021
... applications isolate only those individuals who were directly exposed to the virus. Contact tracing has a long history in the management of infectious diseases. If implemented early, it can contribute to interrupting chains of transmission by identifying and isolating individuals who have been...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2007) 19 (2): 247–271.
Published: 01 May 2007
... and deadly infectious disease. In announcing its $7.1 billion pandemic preparedness program the following month, the Bush adminis- tration declared avian flu an urgent matter of national security.2 This grouping of various types of possible catastrophe under a shared rubric of “security threats...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2006) 18 (3): 457–472.
Published: 01 September 2006
... leading infectious disease specialist confirmed that “in 4 5 8 theory, obviously, the doctor cannot condemn a drug user patient not to take Will to Live medication . . . but the fact is that the homeless patient does not return for routine ambulatorial checkups. So what I do...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1998) 10 (2): 431–442.
Published: 01 May 1998
... and rapidity with which people, ideas and infectious diseases can now travel throughout the world, and to the extent to which any one country’s eco- nomic welfare depends upon the behaviour of persons and authorities outside its own...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (3): 467–486.
Published: 01 September 2005
... is not without functional value both for diabetes prevention programs and for clinical treatments of the disease and the wide range of symp- toms that often ensue, including loss of limb use, internal organ failure, sensory and vision loss, and—for male diabetics—erectile dysfunction. The classification...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2017) 29 (2 (82)): 311–331.
Published: 01 May 2017
... efficacious among medical systems in terms of the numbers of people effectively cured of infectious disease. But, as we all know, things are now at a turning point because of the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The global move to aging societies everywhere and hence to increased cases of chronic...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (1): 101–128.
Published: 01 January 2005
... between the HIV virus and AIDS, the related effi cacy of antiretroviral drugs in treatment of the disease, and his defense of the public health policy of his regime, go to www.tac.org.za. For a broader view of South African...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2013) 25 (3 (71)): 435–452.
Published: 01 September 2013
... of a shortage of organs for donation, as if transplanting an organ were more or less routine. Many cancers that were previously terminal now can be managed, if not cured. Polio and many other infectious diseases have almost been completely eliminated. So these changes are not nothing, despite the fact...
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Journal Article
Public Culture (2017) 29 (2 (82)): 235–260.
Published: 01 May 2017
.... If perhaps we can today find more grisly images of death at the World Trade Center, these images fall well outside the realm of mainstream news sources. Images of diseased or bloodied brown bodies in the aftermath of global South tragedy, however, consistently make the front page. Thus Frantz Fanon (2004...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2015) 27 (2 (76)): 281–304.
Published: 01 May 2015
... attacks. Searching for innovative strategies to confront rampant insecurity, Mockus found inspiration in Cali, Colombia’s third-largest city, where the city government was approaching outbreaks of crime and violence as if they were emerging infectious diseases. Based on this model, Mockus set up a system...
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Journal Article
Public Culture (2005) 17 (3): 371–392.
Published: 01 September 2005
... looks are infectious. The fury flies from face to face, and the disease is no sooner seen than caught. They who in a better situation of mind have beheld a multitude under the power of this passion, have owned that they saw in the countenance of men something more ghastly and ter- rible...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2010) 22 (1): 187–209.
Published: 01 January 2010
...- ment necessary for disease-free living in fixed domiciles: “In a water supply system, for example, health hardware includes both the bore and the basin plug, as well as the shower rose [showerhead], taps and drain” (DFCSIA 2007: 9). Hollows...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2013) 25 (3 (71)): 523–550.
Published: 01 September 2013
... made two ontological conversions. First, it created new categories of people based not on classical groupings of disease but, rather, on their capacity to generate revenue. Author Jennifer Karlin terms this a process of “financial epidemiology.” Second, the UCMC reframed its financial distress...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2004) 16 (2): 161–188.
Published: 01 May 2004
...” and another, more important, “politics.” The latter was not only more important, it was also more infectious. The discovery of political problems would not only lead to the infec- tion of one’s own file but also spread like a virus to the files...