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Journal Article
Public Culture (2009) 21 (1): 101–140.
Published: 01 January 2009
.... imagining the historical project Untimely Vision: Aimé Césaire, Decolonization, Utopia Gary Wilder I have no ambitions about finding a solution. I do not know where...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 191–199.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., it is the social sciences in this translation for Bayart that offer a potential solution to this problem by producing good history, sound disci- pline, and properly French perspective. Enfranchised by the “right to history,” as Aimé Césaire puts it, they will be matured and cured of the disabling delusions...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2009) 21 (1): 1.
Published: 01 January 2009
... shortly before the death of Aimé Césaire. Public Culture joins Wilder in offering its publication as a tribute to him. Interestingly, Wilder’s discussion of the possibilities of liberation struggles that refuse to cast themselves in the mold of national liberation struggles offers a counterpoint...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1994) 6 (3): 479–502.
Published: 01 September 1994
.... Campbell , David . 1992 . Writing Security . Minneapolis: University of Minnesota press. Certeau , Michel de . 1984 . The Practice of Everyday Life . Translated by Steven F. Rendell. Berkeley: University of California press. Cesaire , Aimé. 1972 . Discourse on Colonialism...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 177–189.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Césaire, who had experienced colonial politics and culture firsthand, attempted to define the logic of the colonial system as one of dominance. Fanon had formulated a psychoanalytic theory of colonial violence. By contrast, iconic “postcolonial” writers have formulated a discourse...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 217–231.
Published: 01 January 2011
...-­in-­cheek provocation.11 Yet it is apparently offered as a serious contention: Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Sen- ghor, Albert Memmi, and Frantz Fanon are called on as “proof” of this French involvement with — ­or rather, involvement...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2008) 20 (3): vi.
Published: 01 September 2008
... and future in photographs of Brazil; Gary Wilder dis- cusses Aimé Césaire’s untimely political vision of decolonization without national independence; Ken Seigneurie defragments the discourses of popular culture in Lebanon’s Independence Uprising of spring 2005; Michael Ralph grapples with Hurricane...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 121–156.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, and Jean-­Paul Sartre all underscored the “sordidly rac- ist” and “systemic” compartmentalized violence that colonialism animated, the “lines of force” it created, and the “degradations” it instilled...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2022) 34 (2 (97)): 243–264.
Published: 01 May 2022
... of the colonial science of racial and cultural domination (Appadurai 2021 ). The empire and the imaginary “West” had to be created as a purified body with no trace of African or any other's touch (Bhabha 1994 ; Bernal 2006 ; Césaire 1969 ; Dussel 1993 ; Quijano 2000 ). This article turns to artworks...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2023) 35 (3 (101)): 443–455.
Published: 01 September 2023
..., and not just symbolically.” 9 By centering materialist terms of restitution and compensation, radical decolonial theorists seek to define “what decolonization is not” (Césaire [1955] 1972: 32). It is not the transformation of Indigenous politics into a liberal doctrine of cosmopolitanism, just...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 55–84.
Published: 01 January 2011
... in the 1950s. Several names come immediately to mind: Aimé Césaire and his Discourse on Colo- nialism, Léopold Sédar Senghor and the Oeuvres poétiques, Albert Memmi and his Portrait of the Colonized, and Frantz Fanon and his Wretched of the Earth 12. Mongin, Lempereur, and Schlegel, “Qu’est-­ce que...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 January 2011
... that the deni- zens of the banlieues are equally protagonists of the French nation-­state (Bayart, in this issue: 58). Bayart maintains that issues explored by scholars of postcolonial studies have been elaborated previously by francophone intellectuals, such as Jean-­Paul Sartre, Aimé Césaire...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2011) 23 (1): 167–175.
Published: 01 January 2011
...-­Paul Sartre, together with Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, and Léopold Sédar Senghor, can be said broadly to belong to “French literature,” Bayart makes the claim that “the essential questions of postcolonial studies...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2020) 32 (1): 107–131.
Published: 01 January 2020
... for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago for their continued support of this research. 1 Aimé Césaire (1972 : 77) describes the “American hour” as a type of barbarianism from which one “never recovers unscarred.” He goes on to describe the “gigantic rape of everything...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2017) 29 (2 (82)): 235–260.
Published: 01 May 2017
... as such but the suspension of rights.” Might the ambivalent solidarity of this “coming community”—rendered coherent/cohesive by its time spent languishing in the IDP/refugee camp, the detention center, or the New Orleans Superdome—represent the awakening of Aimé Césaire’s (1960 : 74) “foule qui ne sait pas faire foule...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2001) 13 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Pamuk, Danilo Kiˇs); “postcolonial” (Aimé Césaire, Albert Memmi, Anita Desai, Patrick Chamoiseau, Mariama B and “multiculti,” “native,” or “minority” (Toni Morrison, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Sherman Alexie, Jessica Hagedorn, Gloria...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2019) 31 (2): 289–322.
Published: 01 May 2019
... economy ( Césaire 2001; Williams 1994; James 1989 ; Fanon [1969] 2005 ; Rodney 2011) ; postcolonial criticism and its focus on the discursive, material, and psychic mechanisms that kept the colonial in place ( Said 1979; Spivak 1986; Bhaba 1994) ; and the more recent “decolonial” agenda emerging...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2004) 16 (3): 481–497.
Published: 01 September 2004
... the pride by association that had become part of our skin through the novels and essays of James Baldwin and Leroi Jones (whose Blues People accompanied me on this journey to Senegal) and Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Frantz Fanon, Toni Morrison, Garcia Marquez, Aimé Césaire (whose undiscovered...
Journal Article
Public Culture (2012) 24 (3 68): 487–508.
Published: 01 September 2012
... on tangible and intangible form. Walcott, Frantz Fanon, and Aimé Césaire too sought to identify what I call “durabilities of duress.” VD: Indeed, metaphors are to be shaped and delimited by the thoughtfulness brought to them. AS: Paul Rabinow puts it differently when he invokes Foucault’s notion...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1991) 3 (2): 41–70.
Published: 01 May 1991
... as for the prescientific natives. Anticolonialist intellectuals, although not particularly preoccupied with gender issues, have also used gender tropes to discuss colonialism. Refer- ring to the rape and ravage brought on by colonialism, Aim6 Cesaire and Frantz Fanon, for example, implicitly subverted...