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barbie

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Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 2005) 17 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 January 2005
...: Modernity and Postmodernity (1990). Getting the Id to Go Shopping: Psychoanalysis, Advertising, Barbie Dolls, and the Invention of the Consumer Unconscious David...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1990) 2 (2): i–iii.
Published: 01 May 1990
... rigid yet voluptuous Barbie (and the fantasized scenes with which she is packaged). Now militarized and racially diversified (see 'Miscellany Barbie reifies the link between sex and violence, power and ambition, body and race. Barbie is now a transplant. Multinational toy companies, such...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 January 2005) 17 (1): ix–x.
Published: 01 January 2005
... Trumpener • Peter van der Veer Public Culture Volume 17 Number 1 Winter 2005 Editor’s Note vii Getting the Id to Go Shopping: Psychoanalysis, Advertising, Barbie Dolls...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1990) 2 (2): 135–143.
Published: 01 May 1990
... die more quickly from any of these diseases. I Barbie salutes military mothers3 Leigh Behrens Barbie, that enduring plastic icon of American womanhood, has new marching orders: She has been enlisted as a role model for daughters of military parents...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 1996) 8 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 1996
.... Rand, Eria. Barbie’s Queer Accessories. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. Raskin, Marcus. Visions and Revisions: Rejections on Culture and Democracy and the End of the Century. New York: Olive Branch Press, 1995. Reynolds, Simon, and Joy...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2009) 21 (3): 539–549.
Published: 01 September 2009
...,” in Visual Cul- ture and the Holocaust, ed. Barbie Zelizer (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2001), 45 – 73. 13. While I do not agree entirely with Jed Perl (“Mao Crazy,” New Republic, July 9, 2008) that...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 September 2005) 17 (3): 499–516.
Published: 01 September 2005
... The daughter of a woman abused by a priest plays with her Barbie doll and a poster of a victim during a protest outside Archbishop O’Malley’s installation ceremony. Boston, Mass., July 2003. Figure 9...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1989) 1 (2): 66–75.
Published: 01 May 1989
... Brazilian city of Recife, to have a Barbie doll seems more important than food." The prime mover behind this pan-human replication of uniformity is late western capitalism, equipped with media technology, forever luring more communities into de- pendency on the fringes of an expanding world-wide...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2012) 24 (2 (67)): 261–281.
Published: 01 May 2012
... war, conflicts, and human rights abuses. See Barbie Zelizer, Remembering to Forget: Holocaust Memory through the Camera’s Eye (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998); and Susie Linfield, The Cruel Radiance: Photog- raphy and Political...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 1991) 3 (2): 71–92.
Published: 01 May 1991
... objects that have re- cently come to be defined as ‘%ollectibles,”including Barbie dolls, antique farm implements, and Fiesta Ware (the Art Deco-inspired pastel dishware that was sold to millions of post-World War I1 newlyweds). There remain, however, some crucial differences between folk objects...
Journal Article
Public Culture (1 May 2000) 12 (2): 375–409.
Published: 01 May 2000
...” among countries. Robert Feenstra describes this global outsourcing through the example of the Barbie Doll: The raw materials for the doll are obtained from Taiwan and Japan. . . . the molds themselves come from the United States, as do additional paints used in decorating the dolls. Other...