Finding the words or means to express any particular struggle is hard enough. People spend years, lifetimes even, trapped in inexpressibility even unto themselves, yearning for some sense of recognition that what they have endured is significant and real. Part of what makes solidarity such a powerful gesture is that it can operate in this space of yearning by lending expressive capacity from one cause to another. In the process, the particular struggle becomes a matter of common cause. Solidarity is a recognition that you and I do not need to be the same, or even directly related or connected to one another, for me to take up your troubles as my own. Solidarity can be among the most powerful forms of human experience and expression. It moves against the extraordinary isolation of living in this world. But once the call for solidarity has been heard, what comes next?

This...

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