Time is a palpable presence in the work gathered in this issue of Public Culture, which illuminates the myriad and often surprising roles that history plays in our present. Rather than an accumulation of events, history as revealed by the lights of these scholarly essays becomes the folding and unfurling of time through conjunctions of people, places, and critical issues: US domestic politics, racial memory, neoliberal economics, historiographic analysis.

The Forum section begins with a short essay by John L. Jackson Jr. on the contested symbolic politics surrounding videos of police officers killing black men. We know that the images do not speak for themselves, and yet, as Jackson reminds us, videos often appear as unassailable evidence of unjustified lethal violence. Today, he observes, “the state’s maneuvers are subject to more and more freeze-framed examination,” but that means everyone will become more skilled at interpretation, and justice will...

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