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Tiananmen

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Journal Article
Prism (2020) 17 (2): 457–474.
Published: 01 October 2020
...Haiyan Lee Abstract This article revisits a controversy that initially unfolded three decades ago. The immediate impetus for revisiting the controversy is the thirtieth anniversary of the 1989 protests that ended in a massacre in Tiananmen Square. An intermediate reason is to reflect on how...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (2): 346–367.
Published: 01 October 2019
... accident. Cannibalism not only bewildered the mainstream TV audience, but it was also viewed as an allusion to the June Fourth crackdown on the Tiananmen student movement. This essay explores cannibalism as a method that questions the assimilation of Hong Kong into the national body politic of China. Its...
Journal Article
Prism (2021) 18 (1): 289–292.
Published: 01 March 2021
..., as the emergence and resurgence of old and new media constantly revise public perceptions and intellectual landscapes. Continuing the discussion of digital remediations, chapter 4 focuses on the Tank Man photograph and its iconic Tiananmen legacy in China. The chapter's core case studies include reincarnations...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (1): 62–84.
Published: 01 March 2019
... on the April 5 Incident of 1976, declaring the action of millions of people gathering in Tiananmen Square in the spring of 1976 to mourn, through poetry, posters, and wreaths, the death of Premier Zhou Enlai 周恩來 (1898–1976) and to express their discontent as justifiably “revolutionary” rather than...
Journal Article
Prism (2021) 18 (2): 385–408.
Published: 01 October 2021
... characters. Some context is given (we know that it refers to a brand of car) and much later the gap is retrospectively filled during Wanggyel's discussion of the song “I Love Beijing's Tiananmen” (when he discovers that it is the name of China's capital city). On this first mention, though, the hypothetical...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (1): 197–200.
Published: 01 March 2019
... youth have gathered at Tiananmen Square. The programmed celebration over, groups of classmates stay on through the night, dancing, laughing, singing, even finding romance in the party-like atmosphere of the square. These young people move through their world with confidence, curiosity, and playfulness...
Journal Article
Prism (2021) 18 (2): 501–525.
Published: 01 October 2021
... into question—Chiang engages in his own revolutionary subterfuge to turn the situation to his political advantage. The story concludes with Chiang lying in bed, where he dreams of red flags waving in a breeze that comes from over the Great Wall, which then blows past him as he stands in Tiananmen Square. I...
Journal Article
Prism (2020) 17 (2): 217–224.
Published: 01 October 2020
... purportedly trivializing depiction of the June Fourth Tiananmen Incident in 1989. With historical distance of more than three decades, Lee goes beyond emotionally and politically charged issues of the time and perceives a clash of perspectives and methodologies stemming from the two parties' different...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (2): 298–319.
Published: 01 October 2019
... axis that traverses the capital from Yongdingmen Gate; next to the Altar of Heaven; through the markets around Qianmen South Road; into the corridor now remodeled as Tiananmen Square; to the Forbidden City and Drum and Bell Towers; and out toward the hills to the north of the city. The scroll features...
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Journal Article
Prism (2021) 18 (1): 138–169.
Published: 01 March 2021
... in the New Yorker , Han Zhang describes Ha Jin not only as an immigrant but also as an exile, displaced from China after the government's suppression of the democracy movement at Tiananmen Square in 1989: “After the massacre, he hastened to bring his family Stateside. . . . When Jin later tried to visit...
Journal Article
Prism (2021) 18 (1): 170–187.
Published: 01 March 2021
... maintains that the animation scenes express the characters' imaginations. For example, in the second animation sequence, the “flight attendant” Tao fantasizes that she can escape from the World Park and fly over Tiananmen Square and be truly free. Taking a different approach, Tonglin Lu argues...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (1): 136–156.
Published: 01 March 2019
..., at its most outrageous, Lu Xun's “Kuangren riji” 狂人日記 (The Diary of a Madman) has a twenty-first-century revision. In Ma Jian's Rouzhitu , a young June Fourth protestor is gunned down in the Tiananmen massacre and has since been in a state of coma. Although his body is withering away, the young man's...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (2): 236–259.
Published: 01 October 2019
... hypocrisies of state socialism partially explain the climate of low social trust in the Reform era. 17 This essay will, however, gloss over that history and jump immediately to the post-Tiananmen era, which has seen a crescendo of voices commenting on, lamenting, celebrating, and otherwise exclaiming...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (2): 320–345.
Published: 01 October 2019
..., was imprisoned after the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, and then taught political science in Beijing. 47 The novel follows the exploits of Chen Zhen and Yang Ke, two sent-down youth from Beijing who develop a deep appreciation of Mongolian culture during their decade-long stay with the nomads. Old Bilgee...
Journal Article
Prism (2019) 16 (2): 432–455.
Published: 01 October 2019
... Tiananmen Incident, reminded people of the later 1989 June Fourth protests and crackdown—thereby ensuring that the book would be banned in the PRC. Aside from strictly censored materials, some mainland authors choose to first publish fantizi versions of their books in Hong Kong or Taiwan...