How to come to terms with the past? How to navigate between history, memory, and literature when it comes to political violence and traumatic experiences, such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution? These are questions at the center of modern and contemporary Chinese literary studies. There have been a number of works focusing on the issues of history, memory, trauma, and representation of the Mao era, such as Xiaobin Yang's The Chinese Postmodern: Trauma and Irony in Chinese Avant-Garde Fiction (2002), Yomi Braester's Witness against History (2003), Rong Cai's The Subject in Crisis in Contemporary Chinese Literature (2004), Ban Wang's Illuminations from the Past (2004), David Der-wei Wang's The Monster That Is History (2004), Michael Berry's A History of Pain (2008), Kirk A. Denton's Exhibiting the Past: Historical Memory and the Politics of Museums in Postsocialist China (2014), and Jie Li's Utopian Ruins: A Memorial Museum of...

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