Post-disaster reestablishment of permanent housing is of the utmost importance and has a far-reaching impact on the lives of the masses, since it is the basis for carrying out normal activities and establishing routines after a major disruption (Quarantelli 1982; Peacock, Dash, and Zhang 2007). Housing reconstruction strategists have gradually shifted their focus from materials, techniques, and financing issues to the cultural aspects of design, aiming at “getting people housed in environmentally and culturally adequate dwellings” (Oliver-Smith 1990: 9). Nonetheless, as some scholars argue, the main cause for many failed culturally sensitive housing reconstruction projects is an enduring epistemological and practical chasm between two distinct concepts: housing rebuilding and home reconstruction. The former tends to reduce housing to an “empty” project/space to be filled with political and economic schemes (Harvey 2005; Caldeira and Holston 2005). Anthropologists, informed by the techno-political differences between space and place...

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