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witness

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 385–397.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Annette Wieviorka This essay traces transformations in the figure of the witness from the period of the ghettos to the present, focusing on the meaning and contexts of the predominant forms of testimony during the Holocaust and since. Efforts to bear witness in diaries, chronicles, and unpublished...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2004) 25 (1): 137–158.
Published: 01 March 2004
... of what has been called the poetry of witness or trauma literature. Critics of those subgenres have suggested that literature need not be historically accurate, nor even refer directly to those traumatic events. Yasusada takes that a step further, offering an example of how heteronyms can be used to offer...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (2): 209–255.
Published: 01 June 2005
...Tamar Yacobi In both real-life and fictional testimony, the problems of reliability-judgment multiply when witnesses report events that count as extraordinary. Historians and other judges then suspect the teller of misrepresentation. On such testimonies there accordingly converge the issues...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (2): 257–279.
Published: 01 June 2005
..., became the primary venue where the narratives and the emotions collected. Its intrinsic democratic character was utilized, and every testimony of emotion or witness was accepted as equally privileged, so a television witness had as much right to feel and express this emotion as an actual witness...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 399–423.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Patricia Yaeger When we dress Holocaust texts in too much sanctity, we miss how badly they behave. We may also miss the odd ways a testimony's figures of speech invite readers or listeners to misbehave: to try too hard to recover a sacred sense of witnessing. How do ordinary techniques of literary...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2019) 40 (3): 559–577.
Published: 01 September 2019
... and empathetic emotions for an actual environment—the Appalachian Mountains—that is wounded and scarred. I argue that the novel’s protagonists allow readers to imaginatively experience what it is like to love an environment and then witness its destruction by mountaintop removal mining. Pancake’s decision...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2004) 25 (2): 283–304.
Published: 01 June 2004
...Joanne Cantor To explore lingering effects of frightening media, 530 papers written by students over a three-year period (1997-2000) were reviewed. The students could write about their own fright reactions or about a response they had witnessed in another person. Almost all students (93 percent...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2007) 28 (3): 499–526.
Published: 01 September 2007
... experience that we all too easily take to conform to a Cartesian model—we witness a mind confronting its own temptations to simplify, to adopt misleading philosophical “pictures” or conceptual templates, to hypothesize phantom mental events to fulfill the needs of an unwittingly adopted explanatory schema...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 297–309.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Lawrence L. Langer The search for words to convey the deathlife that was Auschwitz turns up in witness testimony, memoir, and fiction, as all three conspire to find a language appropriate to an experience that is utterly alien to most audiences and that is not based on research from written...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2012) 33 (3-4): 253–299.
Published: 01 December 2012
... experience constructed by the narrative. The fictional accounts of catastrophe will be characterized as such: fiction allows the disaster to be experienced in a paradoxical relation to time, through the point of view of an “impossible witness.” © 2013 by Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics 2013...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2014) 35 (4): 591–613.
Published: 01 December 2014
... analytic, noninterpretive idealistic premises of the earlier textual scholarship known as “New Bibliography.” New Textualist scholars have shifted attention from a disputable end product (an author's “work”) to the genetic details in a range of material text witnesses, highlighting their dynamic “fluidity...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 261–273.
Published: 01 June 2006
... the Holocaust: Collected Essays (New York: Oxford University Press). Lanzmann, Claude 1986 Shoah, foreword by Simone de Beauvoir (Düsseldorf, Germany: Classen). Laub, Dori 1992 “Bearing Witness or the Vicissitudes of Listening,” in Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 249–260.
Published: 01 June 2006
... of witness accounts recorded at a considerable temporal remove from the event. In addition to analyzing a communicative medium, in this case, video—which the Yale archive employed for oral documentation—the essays assembled here con- vey something of the complexity of a collective enterprise that marks...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 425–429.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Jan T. Gross The article calls for close reading of Holocaust testimonies and reminiscences. Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics 2006 Agamben, Giorgio 1999 Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (New York: Zone Books). Akhmatova, Anna 1988 Poems (Moscow...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 451–461.
Published: 01 June 2006
... analysis. We do have many pieces of this complex puzzle and should not ignore any of them.Yehuda Bauer, in his recent book Rethinking the Holocaust (2001: 23), states: ‘‘Above all, we need the witness.There is no Holocaust history with- out witnesses. Direct testimony of the survivors...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 489–495.
Published: 01 June 2006
... and Semiotics 490 Poetics Today 27:2 they had witnessed during the Holocaust, yet in the end, they had noth- ing further to say. They wrote about the deaths of others and their own survival, but they would not write about their own eventual, self-inflicted deaths. Holocaust survivors, by and large...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2017) 38 (4): 667–693.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive . Translated by Heller-Roazen Daniel ( New York : Zone ). Appelfield Aharon . 1988 The Immortal Bartfuss . Translated by Green Jeffrey M. ( New York : Harper and Row ). Baudrillard Jean . 1989 Looking Back on the End...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2001) 22 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 March 2001
... traditionally defining autobiography (author = narrator = pro- tagonist, as in Rousseau’s Confessions) here proves too constraining.What the audience of the Great War stories wanted to know was whether the author had actually fought the war and was entitled to speak as a witness, even...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (1): 187–220.
Published: 01 March 2000
...: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History (New York: Routledge). Habermas, Jürgen 1981 “Modernity and Postmodernity,” New German Critique 2 : 3 -14. Harlow, Barbara 1987 Resistance Literature (New York: Methuen). Mackey, Nathaniel 1993 Discrepant Engagement...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2008) 29 (1): 103–128.
Published: 01 March 2008
...), “mémoire des cendres” (Fresco 1984), “vicarious witnessing” (Zeitlin 1998), “received history” (Young 1997), and “postmemory.” These terms reveal a number of controversial assumptions: that descendants of survivors (of victims as well as of perpetrators) of massive traumatic events connect so...