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voyeur

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (2): 453–455.
Published: 01 June 2000
...). Hearing in Robbe-Grillet Carmen García Cela French, Salamanca 6104 Poetics Today / 21:2 / sheet 189 of 214 Ae-Young Choe, Le voyeur à l’écoute. Paris: P.U.F., ‘‘Le texte rêve pp. More than forty years...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2012) 33 (1): 27–57.
Published: 01 March 2012
... as the subject of his fan- tasy in itself indicates his interest in voyeurism. But if we look at the ele- ments that Rigoberto’s narrativizing ekphrasis adds to the depicted scene, we note immediately that Rigoberto has the king make love to the queen while Gyges watches—which suggests that Rigoberto...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (2): 383–401.
Published: 01 June 2018
... reproductions of his paintings. As David Kennedy suggests in his contribution to this volume, the enduring interest in Hopper’s work is rooted in the pleasure his viewer takes in indulg- ing in a “voyeurism of despair” through Hopper’s “characters self-consciously Bundschuh † Edward...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (3): 479–502.
Published: 01 September 2000
... such as Apollinaire’s, and in novels where a blank page hides either a crime (Robbe-Grillet’s Le voyeur) or an immeasurable duration of sleep (Duras’s L’après-midi de Monsieur Andesmas). But the con- cept is of little help in accounting for the invasion of one sense—vision— of the realm of another, by means...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 561–564.
Published: 01 December 2015
... with a consideration of voyeurism (interpreted as our delight in witnessing the suf- fering of others) and its implications about our self and its relation to others and then moves on to explore the philosophical significance of laughter and disgust. Throughout, Chudo uses many examples from Morson’s favorite...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 564–567.
Published: 01 December 2015
... philosophical content. She begins with a consideration of voyeurism (interpreted as our delight in witnessing the suf- fering of others) and its implications about our self and its relation to others and then moves on to explore the philosophical significance of laughter and disgust. Throughout, Chudo uses...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 567–569.
Published: 01 December 2015
... philosophical content. She begins with a consideration of voyeurism (interpreted as our delight in witnessing the suf- fering of others) and its implications about our self and its relation to others and then moves on to explore the philosophical significance of laughter and disgust. Throughout, Chudo uses...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 570–572.
Published: 01 December 2015
... philosophical content. She begins with a consideration of voyeurism (interpreted as our delight in witnessing the suf- fering of others) and its implications about our self and its relation to others and then moves on to explore the philosophical significance of laughter and disgust. Throughout, Chudo uses...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 572–575.
Published: 01 December 2015
... with a consideration of voyeurism (interpreted as our delight in witnessing the suf- fering of others) and its implications about our self and its relation to others and then moves on to explore the philosophical significance of laughter and disgust. Throughout, Chudo uses many examples from Morson’s favorite...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2001) 22 (1): 25–39.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their control. Remember Lambert Strether as unwitting voyeur of Chad Newsome’s and Mme. de Vionnet’s tryst. James figuratively conveys this predicament by burying the character in the syntax, enmeshing him, reducing him to a parenthetical bystander, a poor soul acted upon rather than acting, tossed about...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2019) 40 (4): 683–698.
Published: 01 December 2019
... running idle. I observe this structure with all the more pleasure since I am slipping from its hands and can rejoice in seeing it constantly miss its prey. I oppose a conquering voyeurism to the text s paranoia; I observe clandestinely another person s pleasure, I enter perversion (Barthes 1975: 17...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2007) 28 (1): 117–142.
Published: 01 March 2007
... of a voyeur, but such viewing of the half-naked Diana, as we are told by mythology, does not end well.10 Acteon, fascinated by the beauty of the naked Diana, could not withdraw his eyes from her and so was punished by the goddess, who turned him into a hart and then killed him with an arrow sent...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2009) 30 (4): 669–692.
Published: 01 December 2009
...” as it is in itself (Husserl 1981 [1917]: 15). This marks a further stage in his backsliding. Étienne’s mistake is to have put his trust in Pierre Le Grand, to have taken him for a guide when he is at best a cynical voyeur and perhaps a sinister manipulator. The disturbing final section of chapter 5 suggests...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2003) 24 (1): 65–90.
Published: 01 March 2003
... and an object of voyeurism—me contested and cast by that which is not me (e.g., Stallybrass and White The actual encounter, the negotia- tion and reproduction of the peripheral condition, is therefore imbued with ritual—it is here...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2003) 24 (4): 641–671.
Published: 01 December 2003
... indulgence in the pleasures of archival immersion. Her 7026 Poetics Today / 24:4 / sheet 28 of awareness of the power of the archive to draw one into the position of the voyeur, a position that is closely associated with that of aesthetic reflection...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (1): 221–262.
Published: 01 March 2000
... am the artful voyeur of your brain’s exposed and darkened combs, your muscles’ webbing and all your numbered bones Recognizing the widely...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (1): 125–235.
Published: 01 March 2006
... embarrassment of readers. ‘‘In The Erasers, the objective world was sustained by the elements of a murder mystery. In The Voyeur,thereis no longer any such qualification of the story: affabulation tends to zero with the murder itself elided out of certainty (Barthes 1972b: 52–54, 94). The canonically...