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involuntary memory

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2017) 38 (4): 635–666.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Robert S. Kawashima The Proustian search consists of a dialectic process. Time, for example, must be “lost” before it can be “regained.” Involuntary memory itself takes the form of this dialectic: an experience (the taste of the madeleine, e.g.) must be forgotten before it can be remembered...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2004) 25 (1): 91–135.
Published: 01 March 2004
... seeks to link litera- ture with life, we must strenuously resist the temptation to take Marcel as his entirely reliable mouthpiece. A Madeleine and a Piece of Toast Let us begin at the beginning, with the first thing anyone learns about Proust, the first involuntary memory with which the narrative...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2007) 28 (4): 573–606.
Published: 01 December 2007
... not be redistributed or altered. All rights reserved. Aristotle 1971 “On Memory,” in The Complete Works of Aristotle , edited by Jonathan Barnes, 1 : 714 -20 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press). Auerbach, Erich 1963 Studi su Dante , translated by M. L. De Pieri Bonino and Dante Della Terza...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (2): 175–207.
Published: 01 June 2005
... and thus, by analogical implication, an involuntary memory. Involuntary memory is, in fact, an unspoken subject throughout Klüger’s essay, and in this respect the four words recollected from Dickinson provide an especially fitting con- clusion, pointing Klüger’s carefully worked through meditation...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 551–554.
Published: 01 September 2005
... composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult to understand or explain the workings of our selves. Fortunately for us, Landy contends...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 554–556.
Published: 01 September 2005
... composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult to understand or explain the workings of our selves. Fortunately for us, Landy contends...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 557–558.
Published: 01 September 2005
... composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult to understand or explain the workings of our selves. Fortunately for us, Landy contends...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 558–561.
Published: 01 September 2005
... composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult to understand or explain the workings of our selves. Fortunately for us, Landy contends...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 561–562.
Published: 01 September 2005
... composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult to understand or explain the workings of our selves. Fortunately for us, Landy contends...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (3): 549–551.
Published: 01 September 2005
... time.These temporary, suc- cessive sub-selves never completely vanish from the overall composition of the self; they remain present and at least partly recuperable, making pos- sible such phenomena as involuntary memory. Complex and inherently contradictory, this picture of the self makes it difficult...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2007) 28 (4): 607–618.
Published: 01 December 2007
... and involuntary memory, each of which, in a parallel suspension of the otherwise rigid laws of human existence, combines imagination with physical presence—but also, unfortunately, runs into a couple of difficulties. Let us start with the idea that, in Proust as in Dante, “the artistic conversion...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2017) 38 (2): 273–293.
Published: 01 June 2017
... Lawrence W. Wiemer-Hastings Katja 2005 “Situating Abstract Concepts.” In Grounding Cognition: The Role of Perception and Action in Memory, Language, and Thinking , edited by Pecher Diana Zwaan Rolf A. , 129 – 63 ( New York : Cambridge University Press ). Basu Biman...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (2): 249–260.
Published: 01 June 2006
..., they are mediated by frame conditions. Many survivors speak not from the countries of their birth but from new, postwar homelands.Their language is often that of exiles caught up by an involuntary displacement. They may even feel exiled from lan- guage itself. Given, too, that there is a displacement in time...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (3): 479–502.
Published: 01 September 2000
... the involuntary memory that has so centrally figured in the recep- tion of this literary masterpiece. In it, Proust seems to give ‘‘instructions for use dictating how to read his novel. A great deal of scholarship—recently by Julia Kristeva—has stopped at this passage to scrutinize its secrets and marvel...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2007) 28 (1): 89–116.
Published: 01 March 2007
... the Franco dictatorship and continuing to the present day. The obsessive memorialization of the Nationalist war dead throughout the Franco dictatorship led, at the time of the transition to democracy, to a desire to break with the past; it was not, as is often argued, a determination to forget...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2009) 30 (2): 237–255.
Published: 01 June 2009
... pervading sense of him. The crossing of the narratorial border here would seem to be involuntary, even compulsive. It is not without relevance in this regard that Povey was reputedly based on the author’s father. Like Bennett in The Old Wives’ Tale, Lawrence maintains the imperson- ality of his...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2017) 38 (2): 295–315.
Published: 01 June 2017
.... 2008 “The Brain's Default Network: Anatomy, Function, and Relevance to Disease,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1124 : 1 – 38 . Cowan Nelson 2001 “The Magical Number 4 in Short-term Memory: A Reconsideration of Mental Storage Capacity,” Behavioral and Brain...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2005) 26 (4): 719–751.
Published: 01 December 2005
... fellow prisoners, D. D. Akhsharumov, reprinted in Dolinin 1964, 1:222–34. Akhsharumov’s memory of the order of events differs from those of Dostoevsky himself as presented in his letter to his brother Mikhail written just hours after the mock execution occurred on December 22, 1849. I am using...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2011) 32 (3): 521–591.
Published: 01 September 2011
... and Racism in Shakespeare’s Tempest ”, in The Woman’s Part , edited by Swift Carolyn Ruth Greene Gayle Neely Carol Thomas , 50 – 64 ( Urbana : University of Illinois Press ). Leverage Paula 2010 Reception and Memory: A Cognitive Approach to the “Chansons de geste” ( Amsterdam...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (1): 187–220.
Published: 01 March 2000
... of the visual sign and the aural fragment in order to investigate the “templet noise / between each word,” Roberson's poems attempt to refigure the visual practices of reading and writing in ways that can bring unclaimed experiences and traumatic histories into public, collective memory. Although his work...