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first-person novel

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 131–158.
Published: 01 February 2018
... of Saskatchewan , www.usask.ca/english/faulkner . Todorov Tzvetan 1969 Grammaire du Décaméron ( The Hague : Mouton ). Narrative Order in the First-Person Novel William Nelles University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Linda Williams Independent Scholar Abstract The topic of narrative...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 41–65.
Published: 01 February 2018
... Institute for Poetics and Semiotics 2018 periodization first-person novel quantitative literary history digital humanities literary evolution References Anderson Perry 2006 “ Persian Letters (Montesquieu, 1721) .” In The Novel , edited by Moretti Franco , vol. 2 , 161...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2010) 31 (1): 51–79.
Published: 01 March 2010
...” of the novelization genre. Such descrip- tions were published during the years in which films were not yet rented but were sold outright to exhibitors—roughly speaking, in the first decade after the start of commercial film production around 1895. Although these texts reproduce with many details the story...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2019) 40 (1): 135–158.
Published: 01 March 2019
... the genre especially suitable for cultivating a phenomenological ethos of reflective attachment in readers. On the one hand, expressive realist novels invite readers to perceive the first-person evaluations that give objects significance for particular characters, promoting affective attitudes...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2004) 25 (2): 241–263.
Published: 01 June 2004
... of literary reading and their meaning in terms of coping with daily life and in terms of a person's biography]. In the first, ethnographic part of this study, six volunteer readers (who had spontaneously purchased a recently published novel) observed their own reading practices. The subjects were interviewed...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2009) 30 (2): 237–255.
Published: 01 June 2009
... presence is negated at will. It was hardly a happy compromise, and in his subsequent novels Lawrence—once bitten, twice shy—never again employed a first-person, dramatized narrator. In his first novel, he simply eliminates his narrator from time to time, unlike Conrad, who erects an elaborate...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2004) 25 (1): 91–135.
Published: 01 March 2004
... not always me only to reassert itself my life once the necessary caveat has been put in place. Proust must surely have known that many readers would overlook the caveat and take the fact that he habitually uses the first person when describing the novel—in essays, correspondence, and dedications alike...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 183–199.
Published: 01 February 2018
... Liesbeth 2008 “ Sincerity, Reliability, and Other Ironies: Notes on Dave Eggers’ A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius .” In Narrative Unreliability in the Twentieth-Century First-Person Novel , edited by D’hocker Elke Martens Gunther , 107 – 28 ( Berlin : de Gruyter...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 February 2018
.... Nicholas Paige provides evidence of the rapid emer- gence and decline of first-person novels as a proportion of all novels published in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France. In particular, he analyzes the proportion of memoir to epistolary “document” novels to argue against a symptomatic reading...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2001) 22 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 March 2001
... French sol- diers) and their families spontaneously granted Barbusse the title of spokes- man. Barbusse, though, was not the first or the only person to write about the trenches; a war novel by René Benjamin, Gaspard, also won a Goncourt in In addition, the author did not yet have the reputation he...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2015) 36 (4): 499–528.
Published: 01 December 2015
... the same world. His is, therefore, an eye-witness (or at least inside) account, and we readers depend on it for information — sometimes, as in a “first personnovel like Moby Dick or Doctor Faustus, exclusively so. Not only do we readers lack access to the object; we cannot count on an alternative...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 67–92.
Published: 01 February 2018
... basis not only of Thomas Nashe’s Unfortunate Traveller (1594), the first English first-person novel, but also of the fictional elements and episodes in the pamphlet literature (Thomas Dekker, William Fennor) or the coney-catching genre. What is notable for the early modern period is not its...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 155–179.
Published: 01 March 2016
... scholarship on we-narra- tives has not explicitly related recent revisions in postcolonial theory to read- ings of postcolonial novels in the first-person plural voice. It is crucial here to direct attention to the multi- rather than unidirectionality of many postco- lonial texts by highlighting more...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 217–220.
Published: 01 March 2016
... identifies as crucial to the novels’ overall rhetorical structures. From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 220–222.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston (where the character narration is framed by that of an external narr...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 227–229.
Published: 01 March 2016
... identifies as crucial to the novels’ overall rhetorical structures. From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 215–217.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston (where the character narration is framed by that of an external narr...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 222–225.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston (where the character narration is framed by that of an external narr...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 225–227.
Published: 01 March 2016
... identifies as crucial to the novels’ overall rhetorical structures. From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2016) 37 (1): 230–232.
Published: 01 March 2016
...’ overall rhetorical structures. From a narratological viewpoint, there is a special interest in the discus- sions of various forms of character (or first-person) narration found in the novels by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner (as a series of monologues), Hurston (where the character narration...