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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 563–566.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., which has been well known since the Renaissance in all European lan- guages; while the second form, the idée reçue or the cliché in English, rep- resents a stronger degree of stereotyping. She shows the importance...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 566–570.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., which has been well known since the Renaissance in all European lan- guages; while the second form, the idée reçue or the cliché in English, rep- resents a stronger degree of stereotyping. She shows the importance...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 570–574.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., which has been well known since the Renaissance in all European lan- guages; while the second form, the idée reçue or the cliché in English, rep- resents a stronger degree of stereotyping. She shows the importance...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 578.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., which has been well known since the Renaissance in all European lan- guages; while the second form, the idée reçue or the cliché in English, rep- resents a stronger degree of stereotyping. She shows the importance...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2008) 29 (3): 595–601.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Various Voices: Prose, Poetry, Politics (New York: Grove). Said, Edward 1983 The World, the Text, and the Critic (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press). The Art of Making It New, Revisited: Beckett and Cliché H. Porter Abbott English, UC Santa Barbara Elizabeth Barry, Beckett...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 557–563.
Published: 01 September 2002
... form, the idée reçue or the cliché in English, rep- resents a stronger degree of stereotyping. She shows the importance of these topoi in her instructive and detailed analysis of a letter from the French nationalist historian...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 539–556.
Published: 01 September 2002
...- bert’s obsession with received ideas, particularly of how Nathalie Sar- raute and Robert Pinget treat the Other’s discourse. Amossy, Ruth 1982 ‘‘The Cliché in the Reading Process Sub-stance 35: 34–45...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2001) 22 (3): 691–696.
Published: 01 September 2001
... of Conventionality Joep Leerssen Modern European Literature, Amsterdam Ruth Amossy and Anne Herschberg Pierrot, Stéréotypes et clichés: Langue, discours, société. Paris: Nathan, (Collection pp. The format of the Collection series imposes on specialists the constraint of surveying a topic within...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (2): 463–465.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Veronique Traverso 2000 New Books at a Glance Ruth Amossy, Anne Herschberg Pierrot, Stéréotypes et clichés: Langue, discours, so- ciété. Collection Paris: Nathan, pp. 6104 Poetics Today / 21:2 / sheet 199...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 579–580.
Published: 01 September 2002
... on stereotypes and cliches: Les discours du cliché (1982), in collaboration with Elisheva Rosen; Les idées reçues: Sémiologie du stéréotype (1991); and Stéréotypes et clichés (1997), with Anne Herschberg Pierrot. She has recently...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 369–394.
Published: 01 September 2002
... at the center of their concerns. To be sure, the specific term is not always used: doxa appears under various guises, such as public opinion, verisimilitude, commonsense knowledge, commonplace, idée reçue, stereotype, cliché. Broadly speaking...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 465–487.
Published: 01 September 2002
... structures (Aristotle’s topoï koinoï) are distin- guished from pragmatical topoi in Oswald Ducrot’s sense and from commonplaces in the positive sense of the term; the notions of idée reçue, of cliché, and of stereotype are described...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 443–464.
Published: 01 September 2002
...). Finally, according to Daniel Castillo Durante (1994), the diversity in the use of doxa (and more generally of stereotype) runs parallel with a diversity 6722 Poetics Today / 23:3 / sheet 82 of 214 of functions. Specific ‘‘clichés’’ (or ‘‘borrowed units most often attract...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2001) 22 (1): 261–262.
Published: 01 March 2001
... 2001 Notes on Contributors Ruth Amossy, professor of French literature and theory of literature at Tel Aviv Uni- versity, is the author of several books on artists related to the surrealist movement (J. Gracq, S. Dali) and on stereotypes and cliches. She also wrote Les idees recues...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2000) 21 (2): 267–292.
Published: 01 June 2000
...- larities is drawn up on the basis of clichéd commonplaces in order to define the European moral landscape: National characters are a certain habitual predisposition of the soul, which is more prevalent in one nation than in others...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2002) 23 (3): 427–442.
Published: 01 September 2002
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2020) 41 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 March 2020
... and simplify. One of the first things that readers of the novel note is the proliferation a loaded term in the book of jargon, catchphrases, and cliche´s. Here one sees DeLillo hon- ing what would become a characteristic feature of his fiction: his ability to take over the idioms of government, advertising...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2009) 30 (1): 133–151.
Published: 01 March 2009
... signifies to the conceptualists what we call cliché, i.e., hackneyed and trite phrases such as ‘towards life,’ ‘struggle for peace,’ ‘in the light of decisions,’ and so on” (Dzhimbinov 2000: 528). Similarly, Sergei Kuznetsov (1997: 456) points out that “an interest in clichéd...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2017) 38 (4): 605–634.
Published: 01 December 2017
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2006) 27 (3): 569–596.
Published: 01 September 2006
... important attempt to engage the discourse of colonialism he praises the way Rushdie ‘‘makes English prose an omnium-gatherum of whatever seems to work, sprinkled with bits of Urdu, eclectic enough even to accommodate cliché, unbound by any grammati- cal straitjacket Feroza Jussawalla, by contrast...