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Nicholas Paige

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 67–92.
Published: 01 February 2018
... at earlier (Wolfgang Rösler, Walter Haug, William Nelson) and later (Nicholas Paige) points in time. The article provides a survey of recent work on fiction(ality) and then discusses the proposals by Gallagher, Paige, and Françoise Lavocat with an emphasis on the transhistorical and transcultural definition...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 41–65.
Published: 01 February 2018
...Nicholas Paige When literary scholars analyze narrative personhood historically, they typically see periods , explained as an effect of deeper psychosocial mutations. Thus the dominant first person of the eighteenth century is the counterpart to a new bourgeois subject, while the third-person...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 93–111.
Published: 01 February 2018
... the novel in Denmark. Accordingly, the reflections on fictionality appear as something new that belongs to the novel. The article compares these findings to the English eighteenth-century novel and discusses novel theorists, such as Michael McKeon, Gregory Currie, Catherine Gallagher, and Nicholas D. Paige...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 221–223.
Published: 01 February 2018
... work in progress includes forthcoming book chap- ters on Jane Austen and a book-length study of narrative order. Nicholas Paige teaches in the Department of French at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the history of the novel...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (2018) 39 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 February 2018
.... Nicholas Paige provides evidence of the rapid emer- gence and decline of first-person novels as a proportion of all novels published in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France. In particular, he analyzes the proportion of memoir to epistolary “document” novels to argue against a symptomatic reading...