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Ian McEwan

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2011) 32 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 March 2011
...Jane F. Thrailkill Drawing on cognitive science, literary critics such as Mark Turner have affirmed that for human beings thinking is crucially bound up with narrative. This essay examines how Ian McEwan in his novel Saturday (2005) adds a specifically affective element to the human engagement with...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2018) 39 (3): 473–494.
Published: 01 September 2018
... through close readings of Ian McEwan’s On Chesil Beach and Hilary Mantel’s Beyond Black . In a first step, Nielsen defines fictionality for unnatural approaches to fiction as “invention.” Kukkonen argues that there are many mental operations that qualify as invented, such as thought experiments and...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2011) 32 (4): 763–765.
Published: 01 December 2011
... 489 Thrailkill, Jane F. Ian McEwan’s Neurological Novel 171 Vermeule, Blakey A Comeuppance Theory of Narrative and Emotions 235 Wehrs, Donald R. Placing Human Constants within Literary History: Generic Revision and Affective Sociality in The Winter’s Tale...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2017) 38 (3): 569–587.
Published: 01 September 2017
... . Translated by Bennington Geoff Massumi Brian ( Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press ). Martel Yann 2001 Life of Pi ( Orlando : Harcourt ). McEwan Ian 2001 Atonement ( New York : Anchor ). McLaughlin Robert L. 2004 “Post-Postmodern Discontent...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 327–360.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Ángel 1964 ¿A dónde van los cefalomos? ( Havana : Ediciones R ). Ash Imogen 2012 “ How Is the Selective Nature of Memory Explored by Ian McEwan and in Biology? ,” PsyArt , www.psyartjournal.com/article/show/ash-how_is_the_selective_nature_of_memory_ex . Belyaev Alexander...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2002) 23 (4): 685–697.
Published: 01 December 2002
... Places” und Ian McEwans“The Child in me” (Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier). Nünning, Ansgar 1989 Grundzüge eines kommunikationstheoretischen Modells der erzählerischen Vermittlung. Die Funktion der Erzählinstanz in den Romanen George Eliots (Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2011) 32 (3): 461–487.
Published: 01 September 2011
... : Faber and Faber ). Reid Alec 1968 All I Can Manage, More Than I Could: An Approach to the Plays of Samuel Beckett ( Dublin : Dolmen ). Rimmon-Kenan Shlomith 2002 [1983] Narrative Fiction ( London : Routledge ). Roberts Ryan 2010 Conversations with Ian McEwan...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2011) 32 (4): 753–755.
Published: 01 December 2011
..., placing some characters and even the reader in a tempo- rarily blinded position” (129); a major part of the chapter is devoted to Ian McEwan’s Atonement and its self-­conscious dialogue with this tradition in the history of the novel. (For a critical discussion of this chapter in its origi- nal form...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2011) 32 (4): 755–758.
Published: 01 December 2011
... the standpoint of an agent with full access to stra- tegic social information and who parcels out that information at markedly different rates, placing some characters and even the reader in a tempo- rarily blinded position” (129); a major part of the chapter is devoted to Ian McEwan’s Atonement...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2011) 32 (4): 758–760.
Published: 01 December 2011
... the standpoint of an agent with full access to stra- tegic social information and who parcels out that information at markedly different rates, placing some characters and even the reader in a tempo- rarily blinded position” (129); a major part of the chapter is devoted to Ian McEwan’s Atonement...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 215–217.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 217–220.
Published: 01 March 2016
... cases where character (or first-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 220–222.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 222–225.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 225–227.
Published: 01 March 2016
... cases where character (or first-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 227–229.
Published: 01 March 2016
... cases where character (or first-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 230–232.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 232–235.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 March 2016) 37 (1): 235–237.
Published: 01 March 2016
...-person) narrators claim omniscience that exceeds what is considered possible within human capabilities (e.g., in Toni Morrison’s Jazz [1992] and Ian McEwan’s Atonement [2001 Dawson notes that this type of narration has increased in volume and importance over the last three decades and considers this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2014) 35 (3): 477–481.
Published: 01 September 2014
... adaptations. The first two concern Atonement (2007). Yvonne Griggs analyzes the efforts made in the screen adaptation of Ian McEwan’s novel, by the scriptwriter Christopher Hampton and the director John Wright (who replaced Richard Eyre), to remain faithful to the source text — to its narrative ambiguity...