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Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2012) 33 (3-4): 301–328.
Published: 01 December 2012
...Alastair Renfrew Iurii Tynianov’s characterization of the relationship between Fyodor Dostoevsky and Nikolai Gogol as parodic, which he later develops into a broader concern with the mechanics of literary evolution, also provokes a concern with the specifically dialectical nature of the change of...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2016) 37 (3): 387–413.
Published: 01 September 2016
... radically different in terms of their political commitments, as the article demonstrates, meet in the space of Fyodor Dostoevsky's prose, which was an important reference point for their respective eschatological projects. © 2016 by Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics 2016 Vasily Rozanov...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 December 2005) 26 (4): 719–751.
Published: 01 December 2005
..., Individuality, and the Self in Western Thought , edited by Thomas C. Heller, Morton Sosna, and David E. Wellbery, 140 -62 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press). Dolinin, A. S., ed. 1964 F. M. Dostoevskii v vospominaniiakh sovremennikov , 2 vols. (Moscow: Khudozh.lit-ra). Dostoevsky, Fyodor M...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2017) 38 (3): 601–603.
Published: 01 September 2017
...: Dostoevsky and Genre in the 1870s (2013) and articles on Fyodor Dostoevsky, Lev Tolstoy, Alexander Herzen, Mikhail Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Alexander Veselovsky. Michael Holquist (1935 – 2016) was born in Rockford, Illinois, and learned Russian while serving in the US Army. He earned a BA at the...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2017) 38 (3): 589–599.
Published: 01 September 2017
... is first of all a superbly edited collection of essays on topics of interest to all students of literature. Each of these makes a significant contribution to its subject, whether that be a par- ticular author (Homer, Pindar, Aeschylus, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Mikhail M. Bakhtin) or a new idea about...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2012) 33 (2): 241–244.
Published: 01 June 2012
... Saul Morson discusses the “open time” chronotope dominant in the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (one of Bakhtin’s favorite authors, whose writing embodied in his view the ideal of “dialogism” or “polyphony Morson spells out the ethical and theological consequences of this...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2012) 33 (2): 244–247.
Published: 01 June 2012
... in the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (one of Bakhtin’s favorite authors, whose writing embodied in his view the ideal of “dialogism” or “polyphony Morson spells out the ethical and theological consequences of this chronotope for agency and freedom of choice and for the ways these...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2012) 33 (2): 247–249.
Published: 01 June 2012
... in the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (one of Bakhtin’s favorite authors, whose writing embodied in his view the ideal of “dialogism” or “polyphony Morson spells out the ethical and theological consequences of this chronotope for agency and freedom of choice and for the ways these...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2011) 32 (2): 391–392.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... Hoffmann, Charles Dickens, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Throughout, the analysis of plot devices is inter- spersed with interesting comparisons of the two different media, literature and cinema. For example, Shklovsky comments on the length of time typically required to present suspense...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2011) 32 (2): 392–396.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... Hoffmann, Charles Dickens, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Throughout, the analysis of plot devices is inter- spersed with interesting comparisons of the two different media, literature and cinema. For example, Shklovsky comments on the length of time typically required to present suspense...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2011) 32 (2): 396–398.
Published: 01 June 2011
... retardation devices; his detailed narrative illustrations come from E. T. A. Hoffmann, Charles Dickens, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Throughout, the analysis of plot devices is inter- spersed with interesting comparisons of the two different media, literature and cinema. For example...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 June 2011) 32 (2): 398–399.
Published: 01 June 2011
... retardation devices; his detailed narrative illustrations come from E. T. A. Hoffmann, Charles Dickens, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Throughout, the analysis of plot devices is inter- spersed with interesting comparisons of the two different media, literature and cinema. For example...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 401–403.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 404–407.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 408–411.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 411–414.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 414–417.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a member of the formalist group, although advocating a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 418–421.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 421–425.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...
Journal Article
Poetics Today (1 September 2013) 34 (3): 425–428.
Published: 01 September 2013
... his studies of the carnivalesque in the contexts of Franc¸ois Rabelais’s and Fyodor Dostoevsky’s works), Vladimir Propp (his study of the action sequence in the fairy tale), and Roman Jakobson. Shklovsky’s discussion of Jakobson’s work has a special claim to notice, since the latter started as a...